Posts tagged ‘Blackstar’

03/05/2018

Now on Soundcloud: LTD M-400M & MH-1000NT

Demo track recorded with a Blackstar HT-1R.

Rhythm guitars – MH-1000NT (left) & M-400M (right)

First solo – MH-1000NT
Second solo – M-400M

06/04/2018

Review: TOOB 12J & 12R

Some of the coolest inventions tend to make you go ”Geez, this is so obvious! Why didn’t I think of this?”

The truth is, though, that the basic idea usually is only the first impetus for going on an exploratory journey. You have to have the inventor’s drive and perseverance to grab the idea by its throat, and hold it there for as long as it takes to hew and mould it into its final shape.

Finnish guitarist/inventor Markku Pietinen had become increasingly frustrated by the weight and size of traditional speaker cabinets for guitar. Modern technology – like Class D power amps – has lead to ever smaller amplifier sizes, yet cabinets were still cumbersome and angular.

Then one day, a few years ago, Markku passed by a building site, where he spotted a leftover piece of corrugated plastic pipe (normally used for drainage) on the ground. The proverbial lightbulb went ”ping”, and Markku started pursuing his quest for a lighter speaker cabinet.

****

Here is the finished product, called the TOOB™ (current price in Finland: 369 €), which stands for ”Thinking Out Of the Box”.

The TOOB is available in two guitar versions, the 12J and 12R (as reviewed), which come loaded with a 12-inch Jensen speaker. A bass version – the TOOB 12B – is also available, and it sports a Celestion unit.

Standard colours for all TOOBs are black and cinnamon, but you can also order custom options with a painted or covered veneer overlay (you can see a few examples in the opening picture).

The TOOB’s cabinet consists of a length of Uponor IQ drainage pipe. This is an extremely lightweight and strong corrugated tube made from double-walled polypropylene. The mounting rims are a proprietary design, injection moulded from ABS plastic specifically for use in the TOOB cabinets.

Clip-on stainless steel feet come as standard, but if this looks too spartan for your taste, you can always order your TOOB with a magnetically-attached wooden stand.

The main difference between the TOOB 12J (left) and the 12R (right) is easy to spot:

The 12J (stands for Jazz) is an open back cabinet, while the 12R (= Rock) uses a ported back wall. The 12J is also a few centimetres shorter than its brother.

Both guitar versions sport two parallel jack connectors, allowing you to daisy-chain two (or more) TOOBs.

The cabinets are equipped with painted wooden mounts for use with a micro-amp of your choice (professional velcro-type adhesive strips are provided). A top notch angled plug speaker cable is also part of the package.

Both guitar TOOBs come loaded with a lightweight 12″/8 Ω Jensen Jet Tornado neodymium speaker.

****

Testing the TOOBs with two different valve amplifiers – a Blackstar HT-1R and a Bluetone Shadows Jr. – it became clear very quickly that both cabinets are focused on delivering tonal clarity and getting the job done with a minimal amount of fuss.

A TOOB isn’t meant to be an esoteric boutique-style speaker cabinet, full of voodoo-like mystical timbres. These are straightforward musical tools, made to withstand the occasional knock or two, and meant to lighten your load (both physically and psychologically).

Both TOOBs offer a very focused tone that is clear and bright, but not nasty or brittle. The mid-range also stays rather well-defined and uncoloured.

I think one shouldn’t get too hung up on the supposed Jazz- and Rock-connotations of the 12J and 12R models, especially as the 12J also performs well with acoustic-electric guitars, but the differences in sound are easy to hear. The TOOB 12J is the airier and more ”acoustic” of the pair, while the TOOB 12R offers much more low-end punch and overall focus.

CLEAN STRAT

Reference speaker (Bluetone Shadows Jr. combo with a 10″ WGS Green Beret; Shure SM57):

TOOB 12J:

TOOB 12R:

OVERDRIVEN LES PAUL

Reference speaker (Bluetone Shadows Jr. combo with a 10″ WGS Green Beret; Shure SM57):

TOOB 12J:

TOOB 12R:

****

Any way you look at the TOOB™, you will have to concede that this new type of speaker cabinet is an ingenious solution to an age-old problem. The TOOB is just as rugged and roadworthy as it is lightweight and compact.

These unique cabinets sound great, with more than enough power on tap for most of us working stiffs, who play small to medium-sized indoor venues.

Combine a TOOB with one of the current micro-amps, like Vox’ MV50-series for example, and what you get is a powerful rig that’s hard to beat for ease of use and transportability.

****

The TOOB

Lightweight guitar speaker cabinet

TOOB 12J: 369 €

TOOB 12R: 369 €

Contact: TOOB

****

Pros:

+ made in Finland

+ ruggedness

+ weight

+ power handling

+ soundSave

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

12/12/2017

Review: Tokai TST-50 Modern

Tokai Guitars’ extremely well-made Japanese – uhm – tributes to classic electric guitars from the 1950s and ’60s were one of the main reasons why industry giants, such as Fender and Gibson, started their own Far Eastern brands, like Squier and Epiphone, in the Eighties.

Yet Tokai doesn’t cling slavishly to the past, instead the company is also regularly coming up with up-to-date versions of their best-loved models. Their newest updated Strat-style electric is the Tokai TST-50 Modern (999 €; comes with a hard case), which was developed in cooperation with Tokai Guitars Nordic.

****

You could be forgiven to think the TST-50 Modern was a cracking 1960s reissue model at first glance, especially as some of the basic ingredients are virtually identical:

We find a bolt-on maple neck with a rosewood fretboard, and a premium class alder body adorned with a beautiful two-tone sunburst finish.

But a closer look at the headstock gives us a clue that this isn’t a run-of-the-mill TST-50:

A bullet truss rod adjuster on the TST-50 Modern allows you to tweak your neck relief without having to detach the neck from the body, as on vintage style S-type guitars. But despite the bullet truss rod, Tokai have chosen – wisely, in my opinion – to stick with the original four-screw neck attachment.

The Tokai TST-50 Modern comes with a 9.5 inch fingerboard radius, which means that the feel is slightly flatter than on vintage Stratocasters (that usually feature a 7.25 inch radius), but still more curved, and thus more Fender-ish, than Gibson’s flatter 12 inch radius. The TST-50 Modern also sports chunkier frets (Dunlop 6105), making it easier to play than the thin wire used on vintage originals. In combination with the flatter fingerboard radius the bigger frets also make string bending a great deal less work. As a final flourish this models gives you an additional fret (22 instead of 21).

The classic six-screw Stratocaster vibrato bridge was a huge engineering achievement back in 1954. No other vibrato offered that much travel, coupled with excellent sound and very fair return to pitch.

Now – 60 years later – many players do look for an even smoother and more precise ride, than what the vintage model can offer. For these guitarists the Tokai TST-50 Modern offers a modern, two-post vibrato bridge – the Gotoh 510T model.

Gotoh’s 510T-vibrato comes with the company’s groundbreaking FST-block. The string channels inside the FST-block have been drilled much deeper than in a vintage block, which anchors the ball ends much closer to the bridge plate. The strings then pass the bridge plate at a shallow angle, without being pressed hard against the plate’s sharp edges. Thanks to Gotoh’s FST-system the vibrato’s return to pitch is improved vastly, because the strings’ ball ends stay in place firmly. Additionally, this system cuts down significantly on string breakages due to friction between the strings and the bridge’s base plate (like normally seen on vintage Strat bridges).

When it comes to its pickups and control layout, Tokai’s TST-50 Modern follows a classic footpath – a trio of Tokai’s acclaimed Vintage ST pickups, along with a five-way switch, a master volume, and tone controls for the neck and middle pickups. Hidden beneath the three-layer scratchplate there’s a humbucker routing, in case you want to customise you guitar further.

****

Vintage or modern, fans of Strat-style guitars expect a high level of ergonomics from their instrument, and Tokai’s Japanese TST-models never disappoint. All the body contours have been copied from the famous 1957/58 originals – it doesn’t get any more streamlined than this.

The satin-finished neck features an oval C-profile, which is just the Sixties-type of neck shape I enjoy the most on an S-style guitar. Thanks to the flatter fretboard radius and the medium-jumbo frets, the playing feels of the TST-50 Modern is similar to that of a well-loved, much-played, and refretted vintage model (but without any scratches or dents, of course).

The Gotoh 510T vibrato works like a dream. It’s smooth and precise, but doesn’t add any unwelcome metallic overtones or sharpness to the sound (unlike some Floyd Rose bridges).

The Tokai TST-50 Modern sounds like a top-drawer Strat should.

Here’s a clip with the Tokai TST-50 Modern plugged into a hand-wired Tweed Champ clone (a Juketone True Blood):

I’ve used Electro-Harmonix’ Germanium 4 Big Muff Pi and Nano Big Muff Pi pedals on the demo track (in addition to the Tokai and a Blackstar HT-1R valve combo):

****

Gear reviewers often face criticism for not ”dishing the dirt” on the equipment they test, but in the Tokai TST-50 Modern’s case there isn’t really anything negative to write about. This is an extremely well-made updated version of the most famous electric guitar of them all. The Tokai combines modern playability with delicious vintage sounds.

****
Tokai Guitars TST-50 Modern

999 € (quality hard case included)

Finnish distribution: Musamaailma

Pros:

+ Japanese craftsmanship

+ sensible updates

+ playability

+ sound

+ outstanding value-for-money

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

22/11/2017

Testipenkissä: Tokai TST-50 Modern

Japanilaisen Tokai Guitarsin erittäin laadukkaat, mutta suhteellisen edulliset – kröhöm – kunnianosoitukset 1950- ja ’60-luvun klassikkosoittimille olivat yksi pääasiallinen syy sille, että esimerkiksi Fender ja Gibson perustivat 1980-luvun alussa omat aasialaiset tytärmerkkinsä Squier ja Epiphone.

Tokai ei kuitenkaan elä menneisyydessä, vaan valmistaa pikkutarkkojen klassikkokopioiden lisäksi Japanissa myös nykysoittajien tarpeisiin vastaavia kitaroita ja bassoja. Uusin modernimpi malli on Tokai Guitars Nordicin kanssa yhteistyössä kehitetty Tokai TST-50 Modern (999 €; kova laukku sis. hintaan), nykyaikainen Stratotyylinen sähkökitara.

****

Ensisilmäyksellä TST-50 Modern näyttää 1960-luvun vintage reissuelta, ja monet kitaran perusaineksista ovatkin perinteisiä:

Vaahterainen ruuvikaula ruusupuuotelaudalla, sekä premium-luokan lepästä veistetty runko kaksivärisellä liukuvärityksellä.

Mutta jo viritinlavasta näkee, että tämä ei ole rivi-TST-50:

TST-50 Modernin kaularautaan pääsee nimittäin suoraan käsiksi sen bullet-tyylisen säätöruuvin ansiosta, kun taas vintage-tyylinen ruuvikaula täytyy usein irrottaa rungosta kaularaudan säätämistä varten, koska säätöruuvi sijaitsee rungon puoleisessa päässä.

Tokai TST-50 Modern -mallin 9,5 tuuman otelautaradius on loivempi kuin vintage-Stratoissa (joissa se on 7,25 tuumaa), mutta yhä kaarevampi (= Fendermäisempi) kuin esimerkiksi Gibson-kitaroissa (12 tuumaa). Kitaraan on myös asennettu vintagea tuhdimmat nauhat (Dunlop 6105), minkä ansiosta soittotuntuma on nopeampi ja vaivattomampi kuin vanhanaikaisilla, ohuilla nauhoilla. Yhdessä loivemman otelaudan kanssa, korkeammat nauhat tekevät myös bendauksista helpompia. Piste iin päällä on Modern-mallin tarjoama lisänauha (22.).

Perinteinen, kuuden ruuvin varaan laakeroitu Strato-vibra oli vuonna 1954 todella mullistava keksintö. Se tarjosi muita vibroja runsaasti laajemman liikeradan, ja sen “soundi” ja vireisyys olivat hyvät.

Nyt, 60 vuotta myöhemmin, monet soittajat vaativat kuitenkin hienostuneempaa vibratoa vintagea jouhevammalla ja tarkemmalla käyttökokemuksella. Heille Tokai TST-50 Modern tarjoaa nykyaikaisen, veitsenterälaakeroidun Gotoh 510T -vibratallan.

Gotoh 510T -tallassa on firman mullistava FST-blokki. FST-blokissa kielikanavat on porattu niin, että kielet on ankkuroitu vintagea lähemmäksi vibran pohjalevyä. Kielet myös kulkevat pohjalevyn läpi loivassa kulmassa, jolloin ne eivät hankaa reikien reunoja vasten. FST-blokin ansiosta kielet pysyvät myös rankassa käytössä paremmin paikoillaan, mikä parantaa tallan vireisyyttä. Kielet myös katkeilevat huomattavasti vähemmän, koska ne eivät painaudu voimakkaasti teräviä metallireunoja vasten, kuten Straton vintage-vibratossa yleensä.

Mikkien ja elektroniikan suhteen Tokai TST-50 Modern luottaa klassikkoaineksiin – kolme Tokai Vintage ST -yksikelaista, sekä master volume ja kaksi tonea (kaula- ja keskimikeille). Kolmikerroksisen pleksin alle on kuitenkin jo tehtaalla tehty tallamikrofonille humbucker-kokoinen kolo mahdollistamaan vaivattoman lisäkustomoinnin.

****

Nykyaikainen tai ei, Strato-tyyliseltä kitaralta odotetaan aina mahdollisimman hyvää ergonomiaa, ja Tokain japanilaiset TST-mallit edustavat kyllä lajinsa huippua. Rungon muotoilu on kopioitu suoraan 1957/58-vuosien Stratoilta – sulavampaa runkoa saa kyllä hakea.

Mattalakatussa kaulassa on ovaali C-profiili – juuri sellainen varhaisen 60-luvun muoto, jollaisesta tykkään S-tyylisissä kitaroissa eniten. Loivan otelaudan ja medium-jumbo nauhojen ansiosta soittotuntuma on kuin paljon soitetussa, uusilla nauhoilla varustetussa vintage-kitarassa (mutta tietysti ilman naarmuja tai painaumia).

Gotoh 510T -vibratalla toimii mallikkaasti. Tallan toiminta on jouhevaa ja tarkkaa, mutta se ei tuo soundiin minkäänlaista ei-toivottua terävyyttä (jollaista esiintyy monien Floyd Rose -tyylisten tallojen yhteydessä).

Soundiltaan Tokai TST-50 Modern on aito laatu-Strato isolla L:llä.

Tässä Tokai TST-50 Modern on kytketty käsinjuotettuun Tweed Champ -klooniin (Juketone True Blood):

Demobiisissä on käytetty Electro-Harmonix Germanium 4 Big Muff Pi- ja Nano Big Muff Pi -säröjä Tokain ja Blackstar HT-1R -kombon lisäksi:

****

Laitetestaajia aina patistetaan kertomaan “likaisia totuuksia” heidän testaamistaan laitteista, mutta en todellakaan löydä mitään negatiivista sanottavaa Tokai TST-50 Modern -kitarasta. Se on erittäin laadukas sähkökitara, jossa on nykyaikainen soitettavuus, mutta herkullinen vintage-soundi.

****
Tokai Guitars TST-50 Modern

999 euroa (laadukas laukku kuuluu hintaan)

Maahantuoja: Musamaailma

Plussat:

+ japanilaista laatutyötä

+ käytännöllisiä päivityksiä

+ soitettavuus

+ soundi

+ erinomainen hinta-laatu-suhde

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

21/11/2017

Huomenna: Tokai TST-50 Modern

30/10/2017

Now on SoundCloud: Tokai TST-50 Modern

Demo track recorded using Electro-Harmonix’ Germanium 4 Big Muff Pi and Nano Big Muff Pi pedals going into a Blackstar HT-1R valve combo. Additional effects added in Garageband during mixdown.

Lisätiedot: Musamaailma

09/10/2017

Uusi Rockway.fi-katsaus – puoliakustiset

Uudessa Rockway.fi-katsauksessa testissä viisi puoliakustista kitaraa:

Epiphone ES-335 Dot
Green B&B
Hagström Viking Deluxe Custom
Italia Mondial Classic
Tokai ES-60

25/09/2017

Rockway.fi & Kitarablogi – tulossa: puoliakustiset

Rockway.fi-katsauksessa lokakuussa testissä viisi puoliakustista kitaraa:

Epiphone ES-335 Dot
Green B&B
Hagström Viking Deluxe Custom
Italia Mondial Classic
Tokai ES-60

****
Demobiisi pohjautuu Steely Dan -biisiin ”Peg”.
Demobiisissä soolo-osuudet on soitettu kitarat aakkosjärjestyksessä. Komppikitarat – Hagström (vasen ja oikea kanava) ja Italia (piezomikki, keskellä).
Äänitetty Blackstar HT-1 -putkikombolla.

07/06/2017

Testipenkissä: Kiiras Instruments Ahti + Ukonkirves

Kiirassoitin – jo nimestä selviää, että kyse ei ole iskelmäsoittimista!

Simo Iiskola on tikkakoskelainen kitaranrakentaja ja rumpujen tekijä. Kiirassoittimen ydinmallisto – ytimekäs Katras-sarja – on suunniteltu metallikitaristin tarpeet mielessä pitäen, ilman kompromissejä tai anteeksipyyntöjä.

Saimme tilaisuuden testata kahta Kiiras Katras -mallia – S-tyylistä Ahtia ja V-tyylistä Ukonkirvestä (hinnat alk. 1,495 €).

****

Kiiraksen Ahti on sulavalinjainen metallimiehen työkalu, jonka ulkomuodoista on löydettävissä vaikutteita sekä Fender Stratosta, että Burns Bisonista.

Katras-kitaroiden runkojen pintaan on tehty koivun kaarnaa muistuttavia uria. Tahallisesti haalistuneen näköiseksi tehty mattaviimeistely tuo kitaraan viikinkitunnelmaa.

Testissä käyneen Ahdin runko on veistetty kolmesta palasta leppää.

Kaikissa Kiiras Katras -soittimissa on kolmiosainen runko, jossa on leveä keskiosa ja kaksi kapeampaa reunapalaa.

Kiiras Ukonkirves on Iiskolan versio Flying V -kitarasta.

Testatulla Ukonkirveellä on saarnirunko.

Molemmissa kitaroissa on mukavuusviiste rungon takapuolella.

Kiiras Katras -soittimissa on viisiosaiset kaulat vaahterasta ja wengestä. Kaulaliitoksessa käytetään puuruuvien sijasta pultteja.

Pääsyä ylänauhoihille on helpotettu sulavalla liitoskohdalla.

Simo Iiskola käyttää kitaroissaan huippulaadukkaita Gotoh-osia (black chrome -viimeistelyllä), kuten testatuistakin yksilöistä löytyviä Gotoh SG381 -virityskoneistoja.

Myös Floyd Rose -tyylinen talla on Gotohin valikoimasta (GE1996-T).

Wengeotelautaan on asennettu 24 tuhtia jumbo-nauhaa.

Vibratallalla varustetut Katrakset tulevat tavallisesti 16-tuumaisella otelaudan radiuksella, kun taas stoptail-versioissa on yhdistelmäradius (compound radius).

Kiiras-kitaroiden metalligenreä suosiva linja jatkuu myös mikrofonien osalta.

Ahti on varustettu kahdella passivisella humbuckerilla – kaulamikkinä toimii Seymour Duncanin Sentient, kun taas tallamikrofoniksi on valittu Nazgûl.

Ukonkirves tulee mainiosti toimeen Nazgûl-tallahumbuckerillaan.

Erikoisvalmisteiset mikrofonikehykset, sekä kytkin- ja jakkilevyt ovat ruostumatonta terästä, ja niissäkin toistuu kitaroiden tuohiteema.

Ahti-mallissa on kolmiasentoinen kytkin (kaulamikki, mykistys [!], tallamikki), kummallekin mikrofonille oma volume-säädin ja yhteinen master tone.

Ukonkirveessä on master volume- ja tone-säätimet.

Elektroniikkalokerot juotostöineen ovat erinomaisen siistejä. Elektroniikka on suojattu ulkoisia häiriöitä vastaan grafiittimaalilla ja metallifoliolla vuoratulla puukannella.

****

Vaikka kyseinen soitin näyttää mystiseltä, vanhalta puulankulta, Kiiras Ahdin soittotuntuma on juuri sellainen kuin mitä odottaisi huippulaadukkaalta custom-kitaralta – tämä on erittäin sulava ja hyvässä tasapainossa oleva sähkökitara.

Kaulaprofiili on laakea C, mutta kaula on riittävän tuhti tukeakseen otekättä myös pitkien soittosessioiden ajan. Kitaran nauhatyö on erinomaista, vaikka Ahdissa nauhojen päät eivät näytäkään yhtä sulavalta kuin esimerkiksi Ruokankaan soittimissa. Tärkeämpää kuin ulkonäkö on kuitenkin se, että nauhat (ja nauhojen päät) tuntuvat erittäin nopeilta ja kitkattomilta.

Testissä käynyt Ahti oli säädetty C-vireeseen. Soittotuntuma oli uskomattoman sulava, nopea ja tarkka, ja myös floikka toimi kuin unelma.

Seymour Duncanin Sentient ja Nazgûl -humbuckerit lukeutuvat firman tehokkaimpiin ja aggressiivisimpiin passiivimikkeihin. Säälimättömästä lähtötehostaan huolimatta molemmista humbuckereista löytyy yllättävän musikaalinen ja täyteläinen diskantti. Kyllä, nämä mikit pakottavat vahvistimen etuasteen äärirajoille, mutta soundi ei ole tympeä tai yksitoikkoinen.

Tässä on kaksi perussoundit esittelevää klippiä, jotka äänitin Blackstar HT-1R -putkikomboa käyttäen:

Moderni metalli ei ole oma leipälajini, joten käännyin genreen enemmän perehtyneen puoleen. Vanhin poikani Miloš Berka sävelsi ja soitti demobiisin. Kitararaidat on äänitetty Atomic Amps AmpliFire -mallintajan kautta, käyttäen Tube Screamerilla boostattua Friedman BE-mallinnusta, Zilla Fatboy 2×12 -impulssivasteen läpi ajettuna:

Kiiraksen Ukonkirves on fantastinen V-tyylinen kitara metalligenren soolokitaristeille.

Istuminen ei tietenkään ole sallittua, kun soittaa tämäntyypistä kitaraa. Tätä kitaraa soitetaan seisten ja mielellään tukkaa heiluttaen!

Kuten Ahti-mallissa, myös Ukonkirveessä on ensiluokkainen soittotuntuma ja loistavat säädöt (nyt D-vireessä)!

Voi olla, että kuvittelen (tai ehkä se johtuu korkeammasta vireestä), mutta minusta tuntuu, että saarnirunkoinen Ukonkirves kuulostaa aavistuksen verran kirkkaammalta kuin leppärunkoinen Ahti:

Miloš äänitti myös tämän demobiisin Atomic Amps AmpliFirellä, samoja asetuksia käyttäen:

****

Olen varma, että joillekuille Kiiras Katras -soittimien visuaalinen konsepti on liian väkevä. Nämä ovat makuasioita, ja kyseisille henkilöille löytyy varmasti mieleinen kitara maailman laajasta valikoimasta mustia, kiiltäväksi lakattuja kitaroita.

Minusta on kuitenkin selvää, että Kiiraksen Ahti- ja Ukonkirves-malleissa ulkonäkö on vain osa loistavaa kokonaisuutta. Molemmat ovat erinomaisia, käsintehtyä sähkökitaroita, jotka tarjoavat juuri oikeat ominaisuudet nykyaikaiselle metallikitaristille.

Simo Iiskolan Kiirassoitin tarjoaa runsaasti custom-vaihtoehtoja mikrofoneista ja elektroniikasta erilaisiin viritinlavan muotoihin, joiden avulla voi luoda oman unelmakitaransa.

****

Kiiras Instruments Ahti + Ukonkirves

Hinnat alk. 1,495 € (kitaralaukku kuuluu hintaan)

Lisätiedot: Kiirassoitin

Demobiisin tekijä: Miloš Berka.

Plussat:

+ suomalainen käsityö

+ runsaasti custom-ominaisuuksia

+ työnjälki

+ soitettavuus

+ viimeistely

+ soundiSave

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

02/06/2017

Review: Source Audio Gemini, LA Lady ja Nemesis

Source Audio is an American manufacturer of guitar and bass effects, who has a new and exciting holistic approach to what an effect pedal can be.

Because most people feel slightly intimidated by devices that look unfamiliar, Source Audio has chosen to give their One Series pedal range a familiar stompbox look. These pedals may look like regular floor effects, but there much more going on than meets the eye.

Source Audio’s basic philosophy could be summed up as ”maximum flexibility and maximum controllability coupled with the best possible audio quality”.

Despite their deceptively simple looks the Series One pedals offer such a large range of tonal options that a review, such as this one, can only give you a little glimpse at all the available options.

****

The Source Audio Gemini (current price in Finland: 152.15 €) comes across as a traditional chorus pedal.

As a physical stand-alone device the Gemini offers you a choice of three different chorus modes – the vintage-style Classic mode, the fatter Dual mode, and the very lush Quad mode. In addition to the regular knobs for Depth and Speed, there are also controls for Tone and (Effect) Mix.

The One Series’ overdrive pedal is called LA Lady (152.15 €).

The LA Lady, too, comes with three different overdrive flavours – Classic, Crunch, Smooth – and four controls (Drive, Level, Bass, and Treble).

The larger size, as well as the number of different controls, of the Source Audio Nemesis delay (296.65 €) already hints at the wide array of options available.

As a stand-alone unit you can chose from 12 different delay-types, with algorithms ranging from the traditional (Slapback or Analog) to the far-out (Helix or Shifter). Three controls adjust the main delay parameters (Time, Feedback, Mix), and another set of three knobs control the pedal’s modulation section (Mod, Rate, Intensity).

In addition to the On/Off-switch there’s also a footswitch for the Tap Tempo function. The corresponding mini-switch lets you choose from three different tap tempo divisions (quarter notes, dotted eighths, and eighth triplets).

The Nemesis’ preset memory has been placed between the footswitches. You can store eight preset patches for fast recall.

All One Series pedals are true stereo effects, meaning they can process and output stereo signals. The stereophonic effect signal isn’t just processed stereo – with the right channel being a phase reversed copy of the left channel – but there’s a real stereo spread with both channels carrying discrete signals.

The reviewed pedals all need a power supply (included in the package) unit to work properly.

The Control Input is used by a range of different Source Audio controllers, while the mini-USB port lets you update a pedal’s firmware (Windows/OS X).

The Nemesis Delay adds a 1/4-inch Pedal In jack, which can be used with a regular expression pedal for preset switching.

There’s also full MIDI-implementation on the Nemesis.

****

As I’ve mentioned at the beginning, what can be seen from the outside is only the tip of the proverbial iceberg. In reality each of these Source Audio effects is fully-fledged digital effects processor, specialising in a certain effect type, and the user can access and adjust any parameter, even in real time, using a mobile device or one of Source Audio’s range of controllers.

Using Source Audio’s free Neuro-app gives you full access to all of the parameters inside the pedals from your Android- or iOS-running mobile device.

A special cable is included with each pedal that plugs into your phone’s (or tablet’s) headphones output and the right channel input of your One Series pedal. If you use several Source Audio pedals on your pedalboard, there’s no need to plug into each one separately, because you can connect to any One Series pedal in your signal chain simply by plugging into one of the pedals. Still, you can only remote control one pedal’s parameters at any given time. You have to select the pedal you want to edit, before you can perform the parameter changes.

Despite the large number of different parameters on offer Source Audio’s Neuro is surprisingly easy to use. Personally, I do prefer using a tablet, because of the larger display, but a smartphone will work fine, too.

In the Gemini Chorus’ case, Neuro will give you access to such parameters as effect algorithm, additional tremolo, low-pass filter, modulation type (sine, square, dynamic filter), and the parametric 4-Band EQ.

Thanks to the open architecture of the Series One pedals, the Neuro-app enables you to use (and edit) patches of the model range’s other modulation effects (the Lunar Phaser and the Mercury Flanger), too, turning the chorus pedal into a phaser or flanger.

Here’s a short clip of different modulation patches:

There are even more editable parameters offered in the LA Lady overdrive than in the Gemini chorus using Neuro, but the most interesting one surely must be the access to a second ”overdrive engine”. The two engines can run two different overdrive types simultaneously (with options ranging from vintage fuzz to modern distortion), and each engine can then be adjusted with things like EQ.

You can choose from a range of different signal routings using the I/O Routing Option menu. In addition to different mono and stereo input and output options, you can also decide whether to run the two overdrive engines in parallel or in series.

Using the Neuro-app let’s you turn your LA Lady into a different One Series drive effect (the Kingmaker Fuzz and the Aftershock Bass Distortion).

Here’s a short clip of different overdrive and distortion patches:

Using Neuro will double the available number of delay-types in the Nemesis Delay from 12 to 24. The additional delays include complex multi-tap rhythms (Complex Rhythmic), wildly pitch-shifting repeats (Compound Shifter), and a number of low-fi and vintage options (Oil Can, Lo-Fi Retro, Warped Record, Binson).

Additional internal parameters include things, such as the tone of the feedback signal, the sweep filter, or the distortion and noise levels of a tape echo.

The Nemesis, too, offers you a number of different signal routing options.

Here’s a short clip of different delay patches:

****

The Neuro-app isn’t the only way to control Source Audio pedals.

In addition to traditional expression pedals the company also offers a range of different controllers:

The Hot Hand 3 controller uses a special ring for parameter control. The ring senses 3D-movement and has a transmission range of 30 metres.

The Neuro Hub is Source Audio’s very compact switcher that allows you to store up to 128 different sets (so-called scenes) of patch settings of up to five Source Audio effect pedals. The scenes stored in the Neuro Hub can be recalled on the fly, for example via MIDI. The Hub Manager software (Windows, OS X) lets you adjust scene settings and patches using a computer connected to the USB port.

Source Audio’s MIDI-switcher is called the Soleman.

****

Source Audio’s holistic and open approach to effect pedals is so all-encompassing, that a review article, such as this, can only scratch the surface of what is possible. I’m sure I could have spend a few weeks more with these pedals, without ever becoming bored.

This is a cool trio of effects, even straight out of the box. The Gemini Chorus and the LA Lady Overdrive both offer three different effect modes and plenty of scope for quick adjustments. Even as a stand-alone unit the Nemesis Delay is something of a flagship delay pedal, with its 12 delay-types, its modulation section, and the internal preset memory.

Many users would already feel satisfied by these three pedals as they are, because they are easy to use and sound terrific.

Source Audio’s Neuro-app, along with the company’s range of controllers, turns these pedals into full-blown sound laboratories, where only the sky (and your own imagination) is the limit. A new era of effect pedals has dawned…

****

Source Audio One Series effect pedals

Gemini Chorus – 152.15 €

LA Lady Overdrive – 152.15 €

Nemesis Delay – 296.65 €

Finnish distributor: Musamaailma

Pros (all models):

+ sound

+ wide scope for editing

+ flexibility

+ overall concept

+ can be run in true stereoSave

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save