Coming soon… *** Tulossa… *** Bluetone Shadows Reverb



Contact: Bluetone Amps



ESP LTD Thinline TL-6Z, TL-4Z + TL-6N – the Kitarablogi-video

Lisätiedot: Musamaailma


First View: ESP LTD Thinline TL-6Z, TL-4Z + TL-6N

Demo Track

Cover version of ”Big Love” by Fleetwood Mac (Lindsey Buckingham).

Demo track recorded using all three instruments plugged straight into a Focusrite Saffire 6 USB sound card.


Lisätiedot: Musamaailma


Jam Track: 12/8-Ballad in F# (99 BPM)


Jam Track: Electric Blues in E (162 BPM)

Find a longer version of this track HERE.


Buying an electric guitar, part 4 – What accessories do I need?

In this last part of our series we take a look at what a beginner needs to make the most of his/her new guitar.

Fuzz 2016 – Fridget Custom Guitars


• Amplification

An electric guitar needs some type of amplification. Yes, it’s true that you can play an electric guitar unplugged, too, but to develop a good technique you should use an amplifier regularly. Especially with solid body guitars there’s always the temptation to play them too hard, when playing unplugged.

You can either go for a headphone amp…

…or a practice amp, meaning a small, low-powered combo.




• A cable (aka a lead)

You will need an instrument cable to connect your guitar to your amp. Most leads that come with less expensive guitars (sub 1,000 €) are very cheap and nasty – don’t use them.

A quality guitar cable is made from sturdy cable material, which is well-shielded from electromagnetic interference, and it sports two quality plugs.

If you use a Gibson SG-type guitar or any semiacoustic with an output jack mounted to its top, you should get a guitar lead that has an angled plug to use with the guitar. The angled plug will put less mechanical stress on the crucial area around the jack.


• A bag or a case

The safest place for your instrument, when it’s not played, is a well-made gig bag or a hard case.

A well-padded gig bag is lightweight and easy to transport, especially if you travel by public transport or by bike.

More expensive guitars – especially those with set necks – should really be stored in a case. You should also opt for a case if you plan on transporting your instrument in the back of a van or in a trailer, as a case is much sturdier than a gig bag.


• A stand

On stage – or during practice session breaks – you should put your guitar in a guitar stand, when you’re not playing it. Leaning it against the amp or leaving it lying on the floor will result in accidents sooner rather than later.

If your guitar is finished in nitrocellulose lacquer (which means all Gibsons, some upper range Fenders, many luthier-made instruments), you have to make sure to buy a stand that won’t react chemically with your guitar’s finish. Some stands have padding that can leave marks on your guitar, or even cause the finish to blister. Some guitarists even line the contact areas of their stands with linen or cotton cloth to protect their nitro-finished instrument.


 • A tuner

A digital tuner will help you play in tune with the rest of the band. It is also an indispensable tool for setting your guitar’s intonation.

Tuners are available as clip-on units…

…table top tuners…

…or as floor ”effects”.


• Strings

It’s a very good idea to have one or two sets of strings in your gig bag or case, in case you break a string.

If you’re unsure about the correct gauge, ask the shop assistant (or the seller) to tell you what gauge the current string set on the guitar is. You can find more information about string changes HERE.


•  Plectrums

Most guitarists use a plectrum (aka a pick) to strum their electric guitar.

Picks are available in a plethora of different materials, thicknesses, colours and sizes. Luckily, plectrums are also quite inexpensive, so I’d suggest you try a few different picks, before deciding on your personal preference.









ESP LTD Thinline TL-6Z, TL-4Z + TL-6N ++ Testi tulossa ++ Review coming soon


Video by Stephen Lane

Lisätiedot: Musamaailma


Buying an electric guitar, part 3 – Assessing a guitar’s condition

How do you assess the condition of an instrument?

In my view, the condition of any guitar can be gauged by dividing up any possible issues into three groups:

Group 1 – Things that can be changed/corrected easily:

++ truss rod settings

++ dead strings/”wrong” string gauge

++ intonation

++ string height (action)

++ pickup height

++ pickup model (if no woodwork/modification is required)

++ worn-out tuners (if no woodwork is required)


Group 2 – Small and slightly bigger issues that a qualified repairperson can solve:

++ a cracked top nut

++ string slots in nut too deep or not deep enough

++ a faulty vibrato system

++ worn frets or high/low frets

++ crackling controls

++ faulty switches


• Group 3 – Issues that are difficult and/or expensive to repair:

++ a badly warped neck (so-called corkscrew)

++ a set neck that is out of alignment

++ a broken truss rod

++ unrepaired (or badly fixed) cracks in the wood (for example a broken-off headstock)

++ a botched DIY ”customisation”

Would you buy a guitar from Pete?


Here’s one way of assessing the condition of a guitar systematically:

• Tune the instrument and play it for a minute or two. You’ll get an idea of the current set-up, as well as of the general condition and sound of the instrument.

• Is the neck correctly aligned to the body (especially important in set-neck instruments)?

Look at the distance of the e-strings to the fingerboard edges at the 14th fret. If both e-strings are approximately the same distance from the edge of the fingerboard, you’re good to go.

• The truss rod setting (aka relief):

Press the bottom E-string down simultaneously at the 1st and 14th frets (you can use a capo at the first fret), and use it as a straightedge. Take a look at the string at the 8th fret; there should be a small gap between the top of this fret and the E-string – that’s what we call the relief. If the gap is around 0.5 mm, the truss rod is set as it should be. Check the treble e-string in the same way. If there’s a substantial difference between the relief at the low E and the treble e, you’re most likely looking at a warped neck.

If the truss rod setting is not ideal (too tight = no relief; too loose = relief greater than 0.5 mm) you should ask the seller to adjust the truss rod for you.

• Check the nut slots:

Each string is pressed down in turn at the 3rd fret. The string should now be resting on the second fret. Look for a small gap between the 1st fret and the string you’re pressing down. Using a regular 009- or 010-gauge set, there should be a tiny gap beneath the treble e-string and the first fret (when fretting the string at the third fret), just about large enough to fit a sheet of printer paper in there. Because the bass strings need more clearance to vibrate freely, the gap between the first fret and the bottom of each string increases slightly going from the top e-string to the bass E-string.

If the nut slots aren’t cut deep enough, the guitar will be hard to play, and sound badly out of tune in the lowest (open) positions, regardless of action settings and intonation. A luthier will be able to correct the matter for a small charge using a set of special nut files.

If the string slots are too deep (= the strings rest on the first fret, when pressed down at the third), a nut replacement will be in order (except with locking nuts that can be shimmed). Nut slots that are too deep will result in rattling open strings, even if the action and the truss rod have been adjusted correctly. Note: You should check for string rattling using clean amp settings. Playing the guitar unamplified might make you whack the strings harder than necessary.

In most cases replacing a nut is an easy procedure for a repairperson.

• The condition of the frets:

On a used guitar, slight wear marks on the frets are the result of normal use, and this light wear won’t cause any problems.

If the frets are very worn (like the ones in the picture below), you should take the cost of a fret dress (or even a complete refret) into consideration, and maybe try to get the seller to lower his/her asking price.

Refretting bound fingerboards is more complicated and time-consuming than dealing with unbound ’boards, which is usually reflected in the cost. Ask you luthier.

• Check the bridge:

Are all the screws and bridge saddles in working order? Is there ample scope for intonation adjustment?

If the guitar’s set-up is unsatisfactory – the action may be too high or too low; the intonation may be off – ask the seller to adjust the guitar for you before making a buying decision!

• Check the electronics:

Play around with all controls and switches – is everything working as it should? Do all the pickups work?

Scratchy, crackling pots and faulty switches are quite easy for a luthier to exchange. If we’re talking about a new guitar, the shop should take care of this before you buy. With a pre-owned instrument, you will have to take care of the repairs. Note: Replacing electrical components and pickups in semi-acoustic and archtop guitars is generally much more complicated, which will be reflected in the luthier’s quote.

• Check the vibrato:

Does the vibrato (aka the tremolo or the whammy bar) work as it should? Are all the parts in working condition, or are you faced with rusty screws or even broken parts? Is there ample scope for action and intonation adjustment?

If the vibrato bridge looks very worn, or if there are structural problems, like a broken off (or loose) bridge post, you might be facing a complete replacement or a costly repair.

• And finally: Plug the guitar into an amp, and play it some more. Listen to the sound of the instrument. Check its playing feel, its ergonomics, and make a final assessment of its overall condition.

• Based on this checklist (and any possible issues you might have found) you should ask yourself two questions:

  1. Do I like this instrument?
  2. Do I think this guitar is worth its asking price?

Gretsch Streamliner G2420T – full front

















Jam Track: Blues Shuffle in F# (132 BPM)


Kun Shuffle iskee! +++ Shuffling into Wednesday morning!