Posts tagged ‘Casino’

18/06/2018

Seven bridge P-90s and humbuckers played through an overdriven combo

The bridge pickups of seven different guitars played through a crunchy setting on a Bluetone Shadows Jr. combo.

On the compilation track each guitar takes one turn with the order being:

Les Paul Junior –> Casino –> Kasuga –> Melody Maker SG –> G-400 –> Les Paul Standard –> Hamer

29/01/2018

Review: Bluetone Shadows Jr.

Following in the wake of their very popular Shadows Reverb combo, Finnish boutique makers Bluetone Amps have recently introduced a smaller sibling, called the Shadows Jr.

The Bluetone Shadows Jr. (combo starting at around 1,300 €) is a hand-built, all-valve guitar combo, whose sound is based on the classic Vox AC15. Instead of being a straight, slavish copy, though, the Shadows Jr. incorporates many of the up-to-date features that have made Bluetone such a well-regarded boutique maker.

****

The Shadows Jr. has the clean and business-like looks that active players truly appreciate. You don’t want to be slowed down on stage by a control panel that’s hard to decipher. The Bluetone is clarity itself.

This is a single-channel all-valve combo running in Class AB mode giving you maximum output power at just over 10 watts.

The Shadows Jr. is designed around a trio of 12AX7 preamp tubes and a pair of EL84s powering the speaker. The combo’s power valves are cathode-biased, which means that swapping tubes won’t necessitate a trip to your friendly amp technician.

Bluetone is one of the very few amp makers who use torroidal power transformers. These doughnut-shaped devices (the black thing in the upper left corner) are lighter and more dependable than traditional transformer designs, and they offer more exact tolerances. As a valve amp is highly dependable on a stable and electronically quiet power supply for superior tone, Bluetone decided on using torroidal transformers early on, and they’ve never looked back.

The Warehouse Guitar Speakers Green Beret is an excellent choice for a strongly Brit-flavoured combo. Bluetone break in all of the speakers they use with low-frequency sine waves.

Despite being a compact single-channel combo amp (weighing only around 10 kg), the Bluetone Shadows Jr. offers an amazing amount of different clean and gain tones, thanks in no small part to the amp’s PPIMV master volume and the three-step OPC-switch.

PPIMV stands for ”post-power inverter master volume”, which is the preferred way of master volume design at Bluetone Amps, because it eats up the least amount of an amplifier’s tone, when in use. And if you turn the master volume knob all the way up, a PPIMV design makes the master volume ”disappear” electronically, making it completely transparent.

OPC, on the other hand, stands for ”output power control”. On the Shadows Jr. you have a choice of three settings, giving you 0.2, two or the full 10 watts of power, respectively. The magic of the OPC circuit is that it will turn volume levels down very noticeably without changing the tonal character of your settings, while also leaving almost all of the dynamics intact. Many lesser output power designs will turn a clean setting into an overdriven sound when you select a lower output level. The Shadows Jr. will sound almost the same on ten, two or 0.2 watts – the small tonal differences are the result of the speaker being driven differently. With the OPC at the lowest setting you will get approximately 95 percent of the full ”Shadows Jr. experience” at bedroom/apartment block volume levels. That’s fantastic!

The back panel gives you a choice of using the internal speaker or an external 4- or 8-ohm cabinet.

Bluetone have also included their tasty buffered, switchable effects loop with a dedicated volume control. When the loop is not in use, the circuit can also serve as a handy lead boost.

****

Are you looking for a cool little tone machine with a strong Vox-y flavour, and no-compromise build quality? You should do yourself a favour and try the Bluetone Shadows Jr.

The Shadows Jr. ticks all the right boxes:

You get that classic clean tone with that sweet mid-range ”attitude”. A clean tone that is lively, but never glassy or brittle.

With the front-end volume near the other extreme you’ll get overdrive and distortion that is more gritty and dynamic – think later era Beatles, windmilling Townshend, or multilayered May – than creamy and compressed.

But don’t forget to check out the wide scope of break-up Blues and Rock ’n’ Roll sounds to be had between 11 and 2 o’clock on the volume (gain) control (depending on the guitar used). You’re in for hours of wailing soloing and chunky rhythms without ever needing an overdrive stompbox.

Here’s a Gibson Les Paul Junior on its own:

Demo track number one features two rhythm guitar tracks – a Fender Stratocaster (stereo left) and a Gibson Les Paul Junior (right) – as well as a Hamer USA Studio Custom on lead duty:

The second demo track features a Gibson Les Paul Junior (rhythm left), an Epiphone Casino (rhythm right), and a Fender Telecaster (lead guitar):

****

The Bluetone Shadows Jr. is a fantastic little tone machine for the Vox-inclined player, who likes warm clean tones, dynamic break-up sounds, and gritty late-Sixties/early-Seventies dirt.

The build quality is miles ahead of any mass-produced guitar amplifier – this is a handcrafted boutique-grade valve amp. Modern additions like the PPIMV master volume, the OPC circuit, and the switchable effects loop, also raise this amp above any vintage-style copies.

For many the crucial question with low-wattage amps is volume. How loud is the Bluetone Shadows Jr?

Let’s just say that if you’ve only ever tried 10-watt tranny combos before you’re in for quite a surprise! These are ten (-plus) watts of British-style valve amp majesty, with every last ounce of loudness wrung out of the power amp and speaker.

With the OPC and the master on full, this little chap will easily get you into trouble with your neighbours in your block of flats on clean tones alone. If you don’t need 100 percent clean tones, the Shadows Jr. will easily get you through many rehearsals and gigs in small venues. And there’s always the option to stick a mic in front of the speaker.

So, don’t expect a Heavy Metal-type volume onslaught, but be prepared for some serious business.

****
Bluetone Amps Shadows Jr.

Prices starting from 1,300 €

Contact: Bluetone Amps

Pros:

+ Handmade in Finland

+ Master volume

+ OPC

+ Effects loop

+ Sound

+ Value-for-money*****Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

23/08/2016

Review: Blackstar Artist 15

Blackstar Artist 15 – logo

In a way Blackstar Amplification’s new Artist Series breaks new ground for the British amp maker.

Until now most of Blackstar’s designs were based on the typically British tones of EL34 and EL84 power tubes, often associated with Marshall designs.

The new Artist combos feature power amps built around 6L6 valves, as used in many of Fender’s classic designs. According to Blackstar the new Artist amps are designed to combine the best bits of the typically British Class A tone (with two ECC83s in the preamp section) with the dynamic range and chiming top end of a 6L6 power section.

Kitarablogi.com was given the opportunity to take the smaller Artist model – the Blackstar Artist 15 (current price in Finland: 799 €) for a spin.

****

Blackstar Artist 15 – full front

The Blackstar Artist 15 looks like a typical Blackstar combo – black vinyl covering and a dark grey grille cloth.

For a combo that comes equipped with a single 12-inch speaker the amp’s cabinet is rather large. The reason for the cabinet’s size becomes clear when you look at the Artist 15 from behind.

Blackstar Artist 15 – full back

The combo’s Celestion V-Type G12-speaker has been placed deliberately to one side of the combo. Blackstar doesn’t tell us exactly why this configuration has been chosen, but I’d wager that the idea behind this is to harness the benefits of a large, stiff front baffle and a larger cabinet – namely: a crisp attack, and a warm, full bottom end.

Blackstar Artist 15 – Celestion V-Type speaker

Celestion’s V-Type comes loaded with a ceramic magnet. According to Celestion this speaker combines a classic tonality with a modern power rating.

Blackstar Artist 15 – back panel

The Blackstar’s back panel sports a whole array of connectors for things such as external speaker cabinets, a speaker-emulated line out, an effects loop, as well as the channel footswitch that comes with the amp.

****

Blackstar Artist 15 – controls 1

Blackstar’s Artist 15 is rated at 15 watts of output and features two preamp channels:

Channel 1 is the so-called boutique channel, designed to put the least possible amount of components between your guitar and the speaker. This channel sports only two controls – Volume and Tone – before the signal is sent on to the master section.

Channel 2 gives you the full Blackstar-experience – you’ll find separate Gain and Volume knobs, a three-band EQ section, as well as Blackstar’s proprietary ISF-control. Setting the ISF knob to zero will result in bright and sinewy Fender Blackface-style sounds, while ISF at full on will give you muscular, Marshall-type tones from this channel.

In addition to the Master Volume control, the Artist 15’s master section also includes the level control for the combo’s very nice digital reverb.

Channel 1 clearly has a much rounder and warmer basic tonality than the (more versatile) second channel. With clean settings Channel 1 will give you a fuller mid-range compared to the more Fender-like, chimey Channel 2.

Here’s what Channel 1 sounds like played clean with an Epiphone Casino (first clip) and a Gibson Melody Maker SG (second clip):

…and here’s Channel 2 played with the same guitars:

The Artist 15’s channels also differ in the amount of gain they offer:

Channel 1 will take you from clean all the way to Rockbilly-style breakup and traditional Blues overdrive, while Channel 2 offers more than enough dirt for chunky Rock tones.

Here’s Channel 1 at full gain (Casino and Melody Maker SG):

…and here are two clips of Channel 2 with Gain full up:

The rhythm guitar tracks on the demo song have been recorded with a 1970s Japanese ES-335 copy (made by Kasuga; left channel) and a maple-necked Fender Stratocaster (right channel). The lead is played on the Kasuga:

Blackstar Artist 15 – angled

****

Blackstar Artist 15 – pilot light

The new Blackstar Artist 15 isn’t your typical two-channel combo, which offers you a clean channel and a dirty channel. This is a valve amp that’s all about choices and flexibility.

Blackstar have noticed that pedalboards are becoming en vogue again, which is why their new Artist combos offer enough headroom for clean tones in both of their two channels.

For pedal users the big advantage of the Artist 15’s architecture lies in the fact that the combo offers two high-quality clean variants in the same amp. Channel 1 is a back-to-basics boutique-/AC30-style channel, while Channel 2 offers a much broader range of clean tones, all the way from Fender to modern Marshall.

Of course, you’re free to use the Blackstar Artist 15 in the traditional channel-switching fashion, too, which will give you a top-notch clean sound from Channel 1, and a very versatile array of quality overdriven and distorted tones from Channel 2.

Either way – the Blackstar Artist 15 hits bull’s-eye, in my opinion, and I can only recommend checking one out for yourselves.

****

Blackstar Artist 15

799 €

Finnish distribution: Musamaailma

Pros:

+ workmanship

+ clean headroom

+ versatile amp sound

+ great reverb

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

15/08/2016

Review: T-Rex Replicator

T-Rex Replicator – angle 2

Danish effects specialists T-Rex have caused an enormous stir with their newest guitar pedal. Their new stompbox – called  the Replicator – is a genuine, all analogue tape delay, hand-assembled in Denmark. These days tape echoes in themselves are rather rare beasts, but T-Rex ups the ante by giving us the first tape delay with a built-in tap tempo function!

****

What is a tape delay?

The tape delay was the first studio effect invented (back when Rock ’n’ Roll was in its infancy), and it was produced by ”misusing” an open-reel tape recorder (hence the name).

The magnetic tape recorder – originally called the Magnetophon – was a German invention from the 1930s, which used a plastic tape coated with magnetisable material as its recording medium.

An empty – or wiped – magnetic tape has all the metal particles in its magnetisable surface pointing in the same direction. The result is silence (in theory) – or rather: some tape hiss.

During recording the recording head transforms the incoming audio signal into magnetic bursts of different strength, wavelength and polarity, and magnetises the tape’s metal particles, rearranging them into different magnetic clusters. During playback these ”magnetic ripples” are picked up by the playback head and translated back into an audio signal.

In tape recorders, such as open-reel studio machines or C-Cassette recorders, many different factors affect the audio quality of the playback. These factors include things such as the physical condition of the tape, tape width, tape speed, the condition of the parts involved in the mechanical transport of the tape, as well as the exact position of the playback head in relation to the tape.

Most C-Cassette players have/had only two heads – one erase head, plus a combined recording and playback head – but reel-to-reel tape recorders in the studio usually came with at least three heads (erase, record, playback). Thanks to the separate recording and playback heads the studio engineer was able to listen to the recording in progress as it sounded on the tape, while it was being recorded (to listen for tape distortion or tape defects/drop-outs).

Because there is a small physical distance between the recording and playback head, there’s always a short audible delay between the signal being recorded and the playback off the tape. The length of this delay is directly dependent on the distance between the two heads, as well as on the tape speed.

In the end, a recording engineer somewhere hit upon the bright idea to use the studio’s backup tape machine as an ”effect processor”. The engineer used the main recorder in the usual way, to record the song’s final (live-) mix off the mixing console’s master buss. The spare tape recorder was fed only the instruments and vocal parts (from the mixer) which needed to receive tape delay. If you mixed the output of the second recorder’s playback head into the recording desk you got a single delay effect. By feeding a small portion of the delay signal back into the delay tape machine’s input you could get multiple delays.

T-Rex Replicator – under the hood

Tape delays meant for live use usually come with more than one playback head, which makes it easier to fine-tune the length of the echo effect, and which makes rhythmic delay patterns possible. Almost all mobile tape echoes use tape loops as their recording medium.

The T-Rex Replicator comes equipped with four tape heads:

The black head is the erase head, next in line is the record head, followed by two playback heads.

****

T-Rex Replicator – carrying bag

The T-Rex Replicator (current price in Finland: 849 €) comes in its own, vintage-themed ”vinyl leather” carrying bag, which contains the Replicator itself, as well as its power supply, a second tape loop cartridge, the owner’s manual, and a set of cotton swabs (for cleaning the heads with a drop of isopropyl alcohol).

T-Rex Replicator – angle

The Replicator is quite a rugged pice of gear, made to withstand onstage use.

The 24 VDC power supply, though, seemed a little weedy in comparison.

T-Rex Replicator – back panel

The back panel offers the following connectors:

There are the input and output jacks, as well as two connectors for expression pedals, should you want to control the delay time (tape speed) and/or the feedback on the fly.

The little Kill Dry-switch mutes the dry (uneffected) signal in the Replicator’s output. This is a very handy feature, should you want to run the Replicator connected to a parallel effect loop, or to a mixing desk using a send/return-bus.

T-Rex Replicator – top view

The T-Rex Replicator offers you six controls and four footswitches to control its functions:

The On/Off-switch does what it says on the tin. When the delay effect is off the Replicator’s tape loop stops running.

The Heads-switch gives you access to the effect’s three delay modes by switching the playback heads on or off. A green light means you’re using the long mode (delay times of approx. 250 – 1.200 ms), red stands for short mode (125 – 600 ms), while orange means you’re running both playback heads simultaneously for a rhythmic delay pattern.

Stepping onto the Chorus-switch will introduce deliberate wow and flutter (tape speed fluctuations) to produce a chorus-style effect that can be fine-tuned with the corresponding control.

Tap Tempo does what it says on the tin. Although this is quite a normal feature on digital delay units, the Tap Tempo-switch on the Replicator is huge news for tape delay fans. T-Rex have developed a system to control the unit’s motor digitally, making it possible, for the first time, to synchronise a tape delay precisely on the fly.

The Saturate-control holds a pivotal role for the sound of the Replicator’s delays. Depending on its settings the effect can either be clean and dynamic or greasy and overdriven.

Adjusting the Delay Time- and Feedback-controls on the fly can produce some wild and wonderful effects (in Feedback’s case up to and including self-oscillation).

****

T-Rex Replicator – running 2

Despite being a child of the Sixties, who has used a tape echo as the main effect in his first band’s PA-system, I have to admit that I’ve grown accustomed to the clarity and precision of digital effects. My first reaction when I tried out the Replicator for this review was ”Is it supposed to sound like this, or is there something wrong?”

Alas, it didn’t take long for the memories of a distant past to return, and I started to really enjoy the genuine old-school tones emanating from the Replicator. You should remember, though, that the Replicator is meant as a handy, portable tool for the guitarist or keyboard player. You shouldn’t expect Queen-style ultra-long, studio quality delay sounds from a compact unit such as this.

Tape speed is of course the most important variable, when it comes to the audio quality of the delay effects – short delay times (= faster running tape loop) will naturally result in cleaner and more stable sounds than long delay times (= a slow running tape).

The first audio clip has been recorded with the shortest possible delay time, while the second clip lets you hear the Replicator running at maximum delay (both clips feature all three head modes):

In my view, the T-Rex Replicator is a portable tape delay of professional quality. You should keep in mind, though, that a genuine analogue tape echo is always (!) a low-fi device in comparison to a digital delay pedal. But it is exactly this authenticity, the slight greasiness, and the sense of unpredictability a genuine tape echo conveys, that makes the Replicator such an enjoyable piece of equipment. The T-Rex’ delay never sounds tacked on, instead it becomes a natural part of your guitar signal’s harmonic content.

I’d say it is hard to overemphasise the advantages this unit’s tap tempo-function brings. The Replicator makes synching your delay child’s play.

I used the T-Rex Replicator to record two demo tracks, which show off the effect’s sounds in different musical contexts:

Demo Track 1

Demo Track 2

T-Rex Replicator – running

****

T-Rex Replicator – top view 2

There’s no beating about the bush about this – the single restrictive factor to seeing the Replicator creep into the pedalboard of each and every guitarist is the unit’s steep price. Most players will baulk at a price tag of over 800 euros for a ”lo-fi effect”, and rather opt for one of the numerous tape delay modellers, like the Strymon El Capistan.

The Replicator, which is lovingly assembled by hand in Denmark, will find most of its clientele among vintage collectors and well-heeled boutique guitar and amp connoisseurs. If you run your original 1950s guitar through an equally vintage amplifier, running an authentic, mechanical tape delay unit will be like the icing on the cake. Especially, if the tape delay is as reliable and easy to use as the T-Rex Replicator.

Is the T-Rex Replicator the best genuine tape delay ever? To my knowledge, there are currently three different new tape echo models on the market – each of them sound great. I would pick the Replicator, though, because it is small enough to fit on a medium-to-large pedalboard, and because of its nifty tap tempo feature.

****

T-Rex Replicator

849 €

Finnish distribution: Custom Sounds

****

Pros:

+ hand-assembled in Denmark

+ tap tempo

+ two playback heads

+ easy to exchange the tape cartridge

+ authentic sound

+ compact size

Cons:

– flimsy PSU cable

– price

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

01/06/2016

Testipenkissä: T-Rex Replicator

T-Rex Replicator – angle 2

Tanskalainen efektivalmistaja T-Rex aiheutti aikamoisen kohun sen uudella efektipedaalilla. Replicator-niminen laite on nimittäin Tanskassa käsintehty aito nauhakaiku. Nauhakaiut ovat jo sinänsä nykyään melko harvinaisia laitteita, mutta T-Rexin uutuus tarjoaa ensimmäisenä maailmassa digiefekteistä tutun tap tempo -ominaisuuden.

****

Mikä on nauhakaiku?

Nauhakaiku oli ensimmäinen varsinainen efekti äänitysstudioissa (Rock ’n’ Rollin syntymän aikoina), ja se luotiin alun perin väärinkäyttämällä studion kelanauhuria tahallaan.

Kelanauhuri on 1930-luvun saksalaiskeksintö (alkuperäinen nimi oli Magnetophon), jossa tallennusvälineenä toimi magnetoitavilla metallihiukkasilla päällystetty muovinauha.

Tyhjässä – tai pyyhityssä – nauhassa kaikki metallihiukkaset ovat siistissä rivissä ja osoittavat samaan suuntaan. Tästä syntyy teoreettinen hiljaisuus ja todellisuudessa nauhan kohina.

Äänitysvaiheessa äänipää muuttaa tulevan signaalin muuttuvaksi magneettikentäksi, joka magnetisoi nauhan metallihiukkasia ja muuttaa näin niiden suuntaa. Toistovaiheessa äänipää taas lukee näitä nauhaan tallennettuja ”magneettiryppyjä”, jotka muutetaan takaisin audiosignaaliksi.

Kelanauhureissa (ja kasettisoittimissa) äänenlaatuun vaikuttavat monet tekijät, kuten nauhan fyysinen kunto, nauhan leveys, nauhan kulkunopeus, äänipään ja nauhurin kuljetusmekanismin kunto, tai äänipään asento nauhaan nähden.

C-kasettinauhureissa on yleensä vain kaksi päätä – poistopää ja yhdistetty äänitys- ja toistopää – mutta studiokäyttöön tarkoitetuissa kelanauhureissa on tavallisesti ainakin kolme päätä – poistopää, äänityspää ja toistopää. Erillisen äänitys- ja toistopään järjestelmän ansiosta on mahdollista kuunnella jo äänityksen aikana, miltä äänite kuulostaa nauhalla (esimerkiksi särön tai rikkinäisen nauhan varalta).

Koska äänitys- ja toistopään välillä on fyysinen matka, toistopään signaali on aina vähän tulosignaalia jäljessä. Aikaeron pituus on riippuvainen päiden välisestä etäisyydestä ja nauhan kulkunopeudesta.

Lopulta joku keksi hankkia studioon kaksi kelanauhuria. Toinen oli master-nauhuri, jonne äänitettiin biisin lopullinen (live-) miksaus, kun taas toiseen lähetettiin mikserista ne signaalit, joihin haluttiin lisätä erillisen toistopään tuottama viive-efekti (yksi toisto). Syöttämällä osan efektinauhurista tulevasta signaalista takaisin saman nauhurin tuloon saatiin haluttaessa syntymään kokonainen toistojen ketju.

T-Rex Replicator – under the hood

Live-käyttöön tarkoitetuissa nauhakaiuissa on usein enemmän kuin yksi toistopää, minkä ansiosta eri pituisten viive-efektien ja/tai rytmisten toistojen tuottaminen helpottuu. Lisäksi tallennusvälineenä toimii miltei aina nauhasilmukka, joka pyörii omassa erikoiskasetissa.

T-Rex Replicatorissa on neljä päätä:

Musta pää on poistopää, seuraavaksi on äänityspää, ja kaksi viimeistä ovat toistopäitä.

****

T-Rex Replicator – carrying bag

Vintage-teemaan sopivasti T-Rex Replicator (849 €) myydään omassa keinonahkaisessa kantolaukussa, josta löytyy efektilaitteen lisäksi ulkoinen virtalähde, toinen nauhakasetti, selkeät käyttöohjeet, sekä muutama vanupuikko äänipäiden ja koneiston varovaiseen putsaamiseen (isopropyylillä).

T-Rex Replicator – angle

Replicator on todella tukevasti valmistettu laite, joka on nähtävästi suunniteltu myös live-käyttöä varten.

Ainoastaan laitteen mukana tuleva muovinen 24 VDC -verkkomuunnin, ja etenkin sen ohut johto saavat testaajalta muutaman miinuspisteen.

T-Rex Replicator – back panel

Takapaneelista löytyy tarvittavat liittimet:

Tulo- ja lähtöjakkien lisäksi löytyy vielä kaksi liitintä, joiden kautta pystyy säätämään ekspressiopedaaleilla sekä delay-ajan (nauhan nopeuden) että signaalin takaisinkytkennän (Feedback).

Kill Dry -kytkimellä saa poistettua tulosignaalin kokonaan Replicatorin lähtösignaalista. Tämä on tärkeä ominaisuus, jos haluaa käyttää nauhakaikua rinnakkaisessa efektilenkissä tai send/return-periaatteella pedaalilaudassa tai mikserin kanssa.

T-Rex Replicator – top view

T-Rex Replicator tarjoaa käyttäjälle kuusi säädintä ja neljä jalkakytkintä:

On/Off-kytkimellä laitetaan – luonnollisesti – nauhakaiku päälle tai pois; kun Replicator on pois päältä nauha ei pyöri.

Heads-kytkimellä valitaan nauhakaiun toistopäitä – vihreä valo tarkoittaa pidempiä viiveaikoja (noin 250 – 1.200 ms), punaisessa moodissa toinen pää antaa puoleksi lyhyemmät viiveajat (125 – 600 ms), ja oranssi merkkivalo palaa silloin kun molemmat toistopäät toimivat yhtä aikaa.

Chorus-kytkimellä ja Chorus-säätimellä voidaan lisätä tahallista nauhan huojuntaa, mikä vaikuttaa toistojen sävelkorkeuteen:

Tap Tempo -kytkin on tämän nauhakaiun uusi, ennennäkemätön ominaisuus. Digitaalisesti synkronoitu moottori mahdollistaa Replicatorin intuitiivista ja nopeata säätämistä.

Saturate-säätimellä on tärkeä rooli, koska sillä säädetään nauhakaiun äänitystasoa. Saturate-asetuksesta riippuu toistojen puhtaus ja kompressointi.

Delay Timen ja Feedbackin säätäminen lennossa tuottaa villejä efektejä (Feedbackin tapauksessa jopa itseoskillaatioon asti).

****

T-Rex Replicator – running 2

Vaikka olen itse 1960-luvun lapsi, joka on käyttänyt koulubändini aikoina vielä aitoa nauhakaikua, täytyy myöntää, että digitaalisen vallankumouksen takia kuuloni on tottunut sen verran puhtaisiin, tasaisiin ja kirkkaisiin viive-efekteihin, että ensivaikutelma oli ”Onko laitteessa joku vika?”

Muisto menneistä soundeista kuitenkin palasi hyvinkin nopeasti, ja sen myötä Replicatorin aitojen nauhakaikusoundien diggailu ja nautinto. On kuitenkin muistettava, että T-Rexin uutuuslaite on tarkoitettu kitaristin (tai kiipparistin) pedaalilautaan mahtuvaksi efektipedaaliksi. Näissä raameissa olisi täysin epärealistista odottaa Replicatorilta Queen-tyylisiä superpitkiä, mutta samalla studiolaatuisia toistoja (joita on tehty studiossa kahdella tai kolmella isokokoisella master-nauhurilla).

Nauhan kulkunopeudella on iso vaikutus toistojen äänenlaatuun – nopeasti kulkevasta nauhasta (= lyhyet delay-ajat) tulee tuoreempaa ja laadullisesti vakaampaa jälkeä kuin hitaasti kulkevasta nauhasta (= pitkät delay-ajat). Ensimmäisessä pätkässä on valittu lyhyin mahdollinen delay-aika, kun taas toisessa pätkässä kuulee maksimiviiveen soundeja (kaikissa Heads-variaatioissa):

Mielestäni T-Rex Replicator on erittäin laadukas nauhakaiku. Ei pidä kuitenkaan unohtaa, että aito nauhakaiku on toimintaperiaatteeltaan aina (!) lo-fi-laite. Mutta se on juuri tämä aitous, se soundin lämpöä, sekä nauhan tuoma tietynlainen ”vaara” ja ”arvaamattomuus”, mikä tekee Replicatorin käytöstä niin nautittavan. T-Rexin toistot eivät kuulosta päälle liimatuilta, vaan niistä tulee kitarasoundin harmoninen osa.

Ei voi mielestäni yliarvioida Replicatorissa tap tempo -toiminnon tuomaa hyötyä. Nauhakaiun synkronointi biisiin ei koskaan ollut näin vaivatonta.

Äänitin T-Rex Replicatorilla kaksi erityylistä demobiisiä, joista voi kuulla uutuuslaitteen soundeja bändisovituksen kontekstissa.

Demobiisi 1

Demobiisi 2

T-Rex Replicator – running

****

T-Rex Replicator – top view 2

Ei kannata kierrellä ja kaarrella, vaan suurin (käytännössä ainoa) rajoittava seikka T-Rex Replicator -nauhakaiun käyttössä on sen korkea hinta. Tavalliselle keskivertokitaristille yli 800 euroa yhdestä lo-fi-efektilaitteesta on yksinkertaisesti liikkaa. Meille kuolevaisille nauhakaiun laadukas digitaalinen mallinnus (esimerkiksi Strymon El Capistan) tyydyttää omia lo-fi-tarpeita enemmän kuin riittävän hyvin.

Huolellisesti Tanskassa käsin rakennetun Replicatorin käyttäjäkunta löytyy varmaan enemmän vintage-keräilijöiden joukosta, sekä boutique-vahvistimien ja -soittimien käyttäjien leiristä. Jos on aito 1950/60-luvun sähkökitara ja vahvistin, saa T-Rexistä näiden rinnalle autenttisen, mekaanisesti toimivan viive-efektin, joka toimii varmasti luotettavammin kuin loppuun kulunut vintage-nauhakaiku.

Onko T-Rex Replicator paras nauhakaiku ikinä? Tietääkseni maailmassa on tällä hetkellä kolme nauhakaikua sarjatuotannossa, ja kaikissa on soundi kohdallaan. Minä valitsisin kuitenkin Replicatorin, koska se mahtuu (isoon) pedaalilautaan ja koska sillä on tap tempo -toiminto.

****

T-Rex Replicator

849 €

Maahantuoja: Custom Sounds

****

Plussat:

+ käsintehty Tanskassa

+ tap tempo

+ kaksi toistopäätä

+ helppo nauhan vaihto

+ autenttinen soundi

+ kompakti koko

Miinukset:

– virtalähteen johto

– hinta

Save

27/05/2016

Testipenkissä: Blackstar Artist 15

Blackstar Artist 15 – logo

Blackstar Amplificationin uusi Artist-sarja on tavallaan uusi aluevaltaus firmalle. Tähän mennessä Blackstar-vahvistimilla oli vahvat sukujuuret Marshall-perinteessä, mikä tarkoitti että päätevahvistimet on rakennettu EL34- tai EL84-putkien ympäri.

Uusissa Artist-komboissa taas päätevahvistimen perustana toimivat monista Fender-vahvistimista tutut 6L6-putket. Uutuuskombojen perusidea on valmistajan mukaan ollut nimenomaan yhdistää brittiläisen A-luokan soundi (etuvahvistimessa kaksi ECC83-putkia) kahden 6L6-putken dynamiikan ja helinän kanssa.

Kitarablogissa kävi nyt testissä Artist-kaksikon pienempi malli – Blackstar Artist 15 (799 €).

****

Blackstar Artist 15 – full front

Blackstar Artist on ulkonäöltään tyypillinen Blackstar-kombo – musta keinonahkapäällyste, sekä tumman harmaa etukangas.

Vaikka kyse on ”vain” yhdellä 12-tuumaisella kaiuttimella varustetusta kombovahvistimesta, Artistin kotelo on suhteellisen iso. Syy tähän paljastuu kääntämällä koko komeus.

Blackstar Artist 15 – full back

Artistin Celestion V-Type G12 -kaiutin on sijoitettu etuseinän reunalle tyypillisen keskipaikan sijasta. Blackstar ei kerro tarkkaa syytä tähän, mutta veikkaisin että tässä haettiin jäykän etulevyn ja ison kotelon soundillisien etujen yhdistämistä – siis tarkkaa atakkia ja lämmintä bassotoistoa.

Blackstar Artist 15 – Celestion V-Type speaker

Celestion V-Type on keraamisella magneetilla varustettu kaiutin, jolla on valmistajan mukaan klassinen sointi, mutta nykyaikainen tehonkesto.

Blackstar Artist 15 – back panel

Blackstar-kombon takapaneelista löytyy mm. liittimet lisäkaiuttimille, linjatasoinen lähtö kaiutinmallinnuksella, efektilenkki, sekä liitin vahvistimen mukana tulevalle kanavanvaihto-kytkimelle.

****

Blackstar Artist 15 – controls 1

Viisitoistawattinen Blackstar Artist 15 on kaksikanavainen kombo:

Ykköskanava on kombon ns. boutique-kanava, jossa kitaran ja kaiuttimen väliin on sijoitettu mahdollisimman vähän komponentteja. Ykköskanavassa on ainoastaan kaksi säädintä – volume ja tone – ennen kuin signaali lähtee eteenpäin vahvistimen master-lohkoon.

Kakkoskanavasta taas löytyy täysi Blackstar-kattaus – erilliset gain- ja volume-säätimet, kolmikaistainen EQ-osasto, sekä firman kuuluisa yleisluonteen säädin (ISF). ISF-säädin nollassa saa esiin kakkoskanavasta Fender Blackface -tyylisiä kirkkaita ja jänteviä soundeja, kun taas täysin avattuna ISF antaa kombolle Marshall-tyylistä potkua ja tukevaa botnea.

Master-lohkoon on sijoitettu master volumen lisäksi vielä Artistin digitaalinen kaiku.

Ykköskanavan perussoundi on selvästi pyöreämpi kuin Blackstarin kakkoskanava. Puhtaissa soundeissa Channel 1 on lämpimämpi ja alamiddleä tuhdimpi kuin Fender-tyylisesti helisevässä Channel 2:ssa.

Tällaiset ovat ykköskanavan puhtaat soundit Epiphone Casinolla ja Gibson Melody Maker SG:llä soitettuna:

…ja tällaiselta kakkoskanava kuulostaa samoilla kitaroilla:

Särösoundeissä Artist-kombon kanavia erottaa myös tarjolla oleva gain-määrä:

Ykköskanava menee puhtaasta kevyelle Rockabilly- ja Blues-särölle, kun taas kakkoskanavasta irtoaa täydellä gainella jo hyvin lihaksikas Rock-särö.

Tässä ykköskanavan soundit täydellä gainella (Casino ja Melody Maker SG):

…ja tässä kakkoskanavan vastineet:

Demobiisin komppiraidat on soitettu Kasugan ES-335-kopiolla (vasen kanava) ja Fender Stratocasterilla (oikea kanava). Soolo-osuudet on äänitetty Kasugalla:

Blackstar Artist 15 – angled

****

Blackstar Artist 15 – pilot light

Blackstar Artist 15 ei ole ihan tyypillinen kaksikanavainen kitarakombo, jossa ykköskanava on puhdas ja kakkoskanava varattu pelkästään särösoundeille, vaan tässä on kyse monipuolisuudesta ja valinnanvarasta.

Blackstar on nimittäin huomannut, että isot pedaalilaudat ovat nykyään muodissa, minkä vuoksi firma tarjoaa Artist-sarjallaan kaksi komboa, joilla on kummassakin kanavassa riittävästi headroomia clean-käyttöön.

Artist 15:n arkkitehtuurin etu on, että pedaalien suurkuluttajille on nyt kaksi laadukasta puhdasta kanavaa käytettävissä. Ykköskanava on pelkistetty boutique-/AC30-kaltainen vaihtoehto, kun taas kakkoskanavasta irtoa laajempi kirjo clean-soundeja Blackfacesta nyky-Marshalliin.

Blackstar Artist 15 toimii toki myös perinteisellä tavalla, jolloin kakkoskanavan monipuolisuudesta on myös kombon omissa, laadukkaissa särösoundeissa todella paljon iloa.

Kannattaa kokeilla.

****

Blackstar Artist 15

799 €

Maahantuoja: Musamaailma

Plussat:

+ työnjälki

+ puhdas headroom

+ monipuolinen soundi

+ kaiun soundi

25/05/2016

T-Rex Replicator – more sounds

Maahantuoja: Custom Sounds

20/05/2016

More sounds: Blackstar Artist 15

blackstar-artist-15-detail2-970-80

• Two-channel valve amp
• 15 Watts
• 2 x ECC83
• 2 x 6L6
• Channel 1: Volume + Tone
• Channel 2: Gain, Volume, 3-Band EQ, ISF
• Master Volume
• Digital Reverb
• Speaker-emulated line output
• Single 12-inch Celestion V-Type speaker

• Guitars used: Epiphone Casino (with Göldo pickups) & Gibson Melody Maker SG
• Recorded with a pair of Shure SM57 microphones

Maahantuoja: Musamaailma

04/05/2016

Review: Vox AV15

Vox AV15 – logo

Vox Amplification’s new AV-series comprises three affordable guitar combos. The Vox AV15, AV30 and AV60 – named according to their power amp wattage – are modelling valve hybrid amplifiers that combine the best elements of solid state and tube technology.

****

****

Vox AV15 – front view new

KitarablogiDotCom took the smallest of the trio, the Vox AV15 (street price in Finland approx. 269 €) for a spin.

The AV15 is a compact little combo (height: 37 cm, width: 45 cm, depth: 23 cm), weighing in at just below eight kilos.

AV15 cabinet construction

The combo’s cabinet has taken a big leaf out of the book of hi-fi speaker construction. Normally a guitar cab is meant to add its own bit of tonal modification into the mix, but when dealing with a modelling amplifier meant to imitate a number of different amp and speaker configurations, the more linear frequency response of a bass reflex cabinet is highly desirable.

Vox AV15 – back angle

Vox AV15 – back panel

The only thing you’ll find on the Vox AV15’s back panel is the connector for the amp’s external power supply unit (12 VDC, included).

****

Vox AV15 – control panel 2 LRG

The Preamp Circuit-switch lets you select one of the eight amp models offered by the Vox. The selection takes you from Fender Twin-style cleans, and Vox- and Marshall-type crunch, all the way to Rectifier-like high gain tones.

You can fine-tune your tone using the three-band EQ section. The AV15 also comes equipped with an effects section made up of three different effects – reverb, delay and chorus (called modulation on the front panel). You are free to choose any or all of the effects. Each effect allows you to control a second parameter (in addition to the effect level) by keeping the respective effect’s effect button depressed while turning the Effects-control. You can change the modulation speed of the chorus, the delay time for the delay effect, and the length of the reverb tail of the reverb effect. The effects are the only digital bits in the AV-combo’s architecture, the rest of the Vox’ signal path – including the amp modelling – is kept all-analogue.

Here are three short clips illustrating the AV15’s effects (Gibson Les Paul Junior, Shure SM57):

CHORUS (with a little added reverb)

DELAY

REVERB

It may seem a bit unusual, but the AV15 features three different ”volume controls”, which all have a different bearing on the combo’s sound:

The Gain-knob sets the signal level before the signal is sent to the preamp’s valve stage. Low Gain settings result in a clean sound, while higher Gain settings will lead to preamp break-up and (depending on the chosen amp model) distortion. The Volume-control adjusts the signal level right in front of the power amp’s tube stage. Lower Volume settings will give you a clean and dynamic signal, while higher settings will bring in some power amp compression and saturation (= distortion). The last volume knob – called Power Level on the Vox AV15 – determines the final volume level in your room (or in your headphones).

Vox AV15 – tube and switches LRG

While its bigger siblings – the AV30 and the AV60 – feature two valves in their architecture (one for the preamp, one for the power amp), the smaller Vox AV15 makes do with just a single tube for both pre- and power amp duties. This is made possible by the way the good-old 12AX7-valve is constructed, offering you two triodes in one single tube. This means, you can split this valve type to perform two jobs simultaneously.

This Vox’ Valve Stage-section features four small slider switches that you can use to modify the way the two valve stages react and sound:

The Pre Amp side of things sports a Bright-switch for adding sparkle to your top end, as well as a Fat-switch that will boost the bass response.

The switches labelled ”Power Amp” really do make a significant difference to this combo’s ”feel”. The Bias- and Reactor-switches let you select how much the power amp’s tube section is ”pushed” and how much power amp compression will be audible.

Listen to these two sound clips – clean and crunch – to get an idea of how the Valve Stage switches change the combo’s sound (Gibson Les Paul Junior, Shure SM57). Both clips start with all the switches in the left position. Then I put one switch after the other to its right position (starting with the Bright-switch, and continuing left to right):

Vox AV15 – front angle 2

****

Vox AV15 – front angle 3

Snobbism seems to be the fashion of the day – we’ve got cork sniffers, we’ve got vinyl snobs, and we’ve got valve amp anoraks.

But in our heart of hearts, most of us ”old farts” would have been more than happy, if we would have had such a great-sounding and versatile amp as the Vox AV15 when we started playing in the 1970s and 80s! The AV15 really wins you over with its array of inspiring tones and its affordable price tag.

The Vox AV15 is a real amp, not a plastic toy sucking all of the sheer joy of playing out of an eager novice. Vox AV-series hybrid combos can also serve more advanced players as fun living room amps, they can be used for backstage warm-up, and they also make a good figure as home studio amps (as you can hear in the demo songs).

BLUES demo

Rhythm guitars: Fender Telecaster (left channel) & Epiphone Casino (right channel)

Lead guitar: Fender Stratocaster

ROCK demo

Rhythm guitars: Fender Telecaster (left channel) & Gibson Les Paul Junior (right channel)

Lead guitar: Gibson Melody Maker SG

METAL demo

Rhythm guitars: Gibson Melody Maker SG (left channel) & Fender Stratocaster (right channel)

Lead guitar: Hamer USA Studio Custom

****

Vox AV15 – front angle 4

In my opinion Vox Amplification’s new AV15 is a fine choice as a practice amp, for guitar teachers, or for school bands. The affordable Vox AV15 is easy to use and sounds great.

****

Vox AV15

Finnish street price approx. 269 €

Finnish distributor: EM Nordic

A big ”thank you” goes to DLX Music Helsinki for the loan of the review amp!

Pros:

+ compact

+ lightweight

+ versatile

+ Valve Stage-section

+ sound

+ value-for-money

Save

21/04/2016

Testipenkissä: Vox AV15

Vox AV15 – logo

Vox Amplificationin upouusi AV-sarja koostuu kolmesta edullisesta kombovahvistimesta kitaralle. Lähtötehonsa mukaan nimetyt Vox AV15-, AV30- ja AV60 -vahvistimet ovat mallintavia putkihybridejä, jotka yhdistävät puolijohde- ja putkielektroniikan parhaimpia puolia.

****

****

Vox AV15 – front view new

Kitarablogi sai testiin Vox AV15 -kombon (arvioitu katuhinta noin 269 €), joka on AV-perheen kuopus.

AV15 on mukavan kompakti kokonaisuus (korkeus: 37 cm, leveys: 45 cm, syvyys: 23 cm), ja se painaa vain hieman alle kahdeksan kiloa.

AV15 cabinet construction

Vahvistinkotelon (= kaiutinkaapin) rakenne on selvästi ottanut inspiraatiota hifi-kaapeista. Tavallisesti kitarakaappi antaa oman lisämausteensa lopulliselle kitarasoundille, mutta AV-sarjan kaltaisissa mallintavissa vahvistimissa refleksikaapin lineaarisempi taajuusvaste auttaa useiden eri soundien jäljittämisessä.

Vox AV15 – back angle

Vox AV15 – back panel

Vox AV15:n takaseinästä löytyy ainoastaan virtaliitin kombon mukana tulevalle ulkoiselle virtalähteelle (12 V DC).

****

Vox AV15 – control panel 2 LRG

Preamp Circuit -kytkimellä saa valittua yhden Vox-kombon kahdeksasta vahvistinmallista. Tarjolla on riittävästi vaihtoehtoja Fender Twin -tyylisestä cleanista, sekä Vox- ja Marshall-mallinnuksien kautta jopa Rectifier-tyyliseen High Gain -meininkiin.

Vahvistinsoundien maustamiseksi tämä Voxi tarjoaa kolmikaistaisen EQ-osaston, sekä kolme efektiä (chorus, viive, kaiku). Kaikkia kolmea efektiä voi käyttää samanaikaisesti. Jokaisessa efektissä pystyy säätämään efektitason lisäksi vielä toisen parametrin (pitämällä efektinappia alas painettuna, samalla kun kääntää Effects-säädintä) – vatkaamisnopeutta choruksessa, viiveaikaa delayssä, sekä kaiun pituutta reverbissä. AV-kombon efektit ovat muuten vahvistimen ainoat digitaalisesti toteutetut osat, Voxin muu signaalitie – mallinnusta myöten – on täysin analoginen.

Tässä kolme lyhyttä pätkää efektiosaston soundeista (Gibson Les Paul Junior, Shure SM57):

CHORUS (ja pieni annos kaikua)

DELAY

REVERB

Hieman epätavallisesti löytyy AV15-kombosta jopa kolme eri ”volyymi-säädintä”, joiden toiminta vaikuttaa soundiin eri lailla:

Gain-säätimellä säädetään tulosignaalin tasoa, ennen kun signaali menee etuvahvistimen putkiasteelle. Pienillä Gain-asetuksilla soundi pysyy puhtaana, kun taas isommat Gain-asetukset tuovat signaaliin rosoisuutta ja/tai (vahvistinmallista riippuen) selkeätä etuastesäröä. Kombon Volume-säätimen rooli taas on säätää etuvahvistimesta tulevan signaalin tasoa juuri ennen päätevahvistimen putkiastetta. Pienillä Volume-asetuksilla signaali pysyy puhtaampana ja dynaamisempana, kun taas isot Volume-asetukset lisäävät signaaliin hieman kompressiota ja päätevahvistimen saturaatiota (= säröä). Power Level -nupilla sitten säädetään kuinka kovalla kitarasoittosi kuuluu kaiuttimen (tai kuulokkeiden) kautta.

Vox AV15 – tube and switches LRG

Vaikka AV30:ssä ja AV60:ssä on kahdet putket – yksi etu- ja toinen päätevahvistimelle – Vox AV15 tulee toimeen vain yhdellä putkella, joka toimii sekä etu- että päätevahvistimessa. Tämän mahdollistaa perinteikkään 12AX7-putken nerokas rakenne, joka tarjoaa kaksi erillistä triodia samassa kuoressa, minkä ansiosta tätä putkityyppiä voi ja saa splitata.

Valve Stage -osio tarjoaa neljä liukukytkintä, joilla voi vaikuttaa suoraan putkiasteiden toimintaan ja soundiin:

Etuvahvistimelle (Pre Amp) löytyy sekä Bright-kytkin diskantin lisäämiseksi että Fat-kytkin, jolla bassontoistoa saadaan muhkeammaksi.

Päätevahvistimen (Power Amp) kytkimillä on vielä suurempi vaikutus vahvistimen soundiin ja ”tuntumaan”. Bias- ja Reactor-kytkimillä valitaan kuinka ”kuumana” päätevahvistimen putkipuolikas toimii ja miten dynaamisesti päätevahvistin reagoi etuvahvistimesta tulevaan signaaliin.

Tässä kaksi ääniesimerkkiä – clean ja crunch – joissa aloitetaan kaikilla kytkimillä vasemmassa asennossa, ja jossa laitan sitten kytkimet peräkkäin (aloitan Bright-kytkimestä) oikeaan asentoon (Gibson Les Paul Junior, Shure SM57):

Vox AV15 – front angle 2

****

Vox AV15 – front angle 3

Snobismi näyttää olevan tällä hetkellä muodissa – on viinisnobismi, on vinyylisnobismi, on putkisnobismi.

Mutta kun ollaan ihan rehellisiä olen ihan varma, että moni meistä ”vanhoista pieruista” olisi ollut enemmän kuin onnellinen, jos hänellä olisi ollut aloittelijana 1970-/80-luvun taitteessa ollut näin hieno vekotin kuin Vox AV15! AV15 on nimittäin hyvin monipuolinen – ja todella hyvällä soundillaan vakuuttava – hybridikombo erittäin soittajaystävällisellä hinnalla.

Vox AV15 on kunnon vahvistin kunnon soundilla, eikä muovinen lelu, joka lannistaisi kitarauntuvikon heti alkumetreillä. Varttuneellekin soittajalle AV-sarjalaiset voivat olla järkevä hankinta olohuonekomboksi tai backstage-lämmittelyyn, ja myös kotistudiossa AV15-kombosta on paljon iloa (kuten demobiiseissä kuulee).

BLUES-demo

Komppikitarat: Fender Telecaster (vasen kanava) ja Epiphone Casino (oikea kanava)

Soolokitara: Fender Stratocaster

ROCK-demo

Komppikitarat: Fender Telecaster (vasen kanava) ja Gibson Les Paul Junior (oikea kanava)

Soolokitara: Gibson Melody Maker SG

METAL-demo

Komppikitarat: Gibson Melody Maker SG (vasen kanava) ja Fender Stratocaster (oikea kanava)

Soolokitara: Hamer USA Studio Custom

****

Vox AV15 – front angle 4

Minun mielestäni Vox Amplificationin AV-uutuussarja on oiva valinta esimerkiksi omaksi harjoitusvahvistimeksi, opetuskäyttöön tai vaikkapa bändikerholaisille. Edullinen Vox AV15 on helppo käyttää ja se kuulostaa mielestäni todella hyvältä.

****

Vox AV15

Arvioitu katuhinta noin 269 €

Maahantuoja: EM Nordic

Suuri kiitos DLX Musiikille testikombon lainaamisesta!

Plussat:

+ kompakti

+ kevyt

+ monipuolinen

+ Valve Stage -osio

+ soundi

+ hinta-laatu-suhde