Posts tagged ‘Shure SM57’

21/05/2019

Review: Bluetone Amps Fried Eye & Bugaboo distortion pedals

Finnish valve amp specialist Bluetone Custom Amplifiers has broken new ground by releasing a trio of handmade pedal effects, comprising a delay/reverb-unit, called Echoes, as well as two different preamp/distortion boxes, the Fried Eye and the Bugaboo.

****

Bluetone’s Fried Eye Distortion (269 €) offers two high-quality effects in one box:

The boost circuit can be run separately from the pedal’s distortion side. It offers a considerable amount of boost (up to 12 dB), which is adjustable with the pedal’s Boost control.

But the Fried Eye Distortion’s main raison d’être is, of course, its comprehensive distortion section. The pedal’s distortion circuit is a solid-state version of the acclaimed Bluetone Fried Eye tube amplifier’s crunch channel. Its aim is to give you a wide range of Marshall-inspired crunch and distortion tones.

Bluetone’s Fried Eye Distortion pedal runs on nine to eighteen volts DC supplied by a PSU (not included) via a standard 2.1 mm plug (centre negative). A look under the hood reveals a large circuit board and clean and neat wiring.

Soundwise the Fried Eye pedal hits the bull’s-eye in my opinion, offering a wide range of Marshall-type tones from a light crunch to full blast. The effect’s three-band EQ works really well in tailoring the effects sound to your musical needs.

This short audio clip gives you an idea of the Fried Eye’s basic sound with the Gain control set to 12 o’clock. The first half showcases the distortion side on its own, with the boost kicking in for the second half. I used a Hamer USA Studio Custom with the bridge humbucker engaged. The clip was recorded direct off a Blackstar HT-1R’s speaker emulated output:

The Muse-inspired demo song shows you how the Fried Eye performs in a band mix. I used a Bluetone Shadows Jr. combo and a Shure SM57 to record all guitar tracks.

The demo features the following guitars:

• rhythm guitars – Hamer USA Studio Custom (left channel), Gibson Melody Maker SG (centre), Fender Stratocaster (right channel)

• reverse guitar – Gibson Melody Maker SG

• lead guitar – Hamer USA Studio Custom, Morley wah-wah

****

The Bluetone Bugaboo Distortion pedal (249 €) is based on the company’s none-more-Metal Bugaboo valve amplifier’s crunch channel.

The Bugaboo is aimed more squarely at the Hard Rock- and Metal-crowd, offering much more gain and a lot more juicy compression than the Fried Eye pedal.

The wiring inside our review unit looks a bit less tidy, due to the long wires going from the circuit board to the pots and switches. I’d like to stress, though, that this specific pedal is a very early production model that has been superseded by a more compact version (but with completely identical specs and features) recently!

The Bugaboo-pedal, too, runs on nine to eighteen volts DC supplied by a PSU (not included) via a standard 2.1 mm plug (centre negative).

Bluetone’s Bugaboo does exactly what is says on the tin:

This pedal turns any amp into a fire breathing thing of beauty, offering plenty of gain. The three-band EQ has been bolstered by two very nifty mini-switches. Bite offers a presence boost that will help your guitar to cut through even the densest mix, while Tight helps you keep the bottom end from becoming too boomy.

This short audio clip gives you an idea of the Bugaboo’s basic sound with the Gain control set to 12 o’clock, Bite engaged and Tight turned off. I used a Hamer USA Studio Custom with the bridge humbucker engaged. The clip was recorded direct off a Blackstar HT-1R’s speaker emulated output:

The demo song shows you how the Bugaboo performs in a band mix. All guitar tracks were recorded direct off a Blackstar HT-1R’s speaker emulated output. The song contains the following guitar tracks:

• Rhythm guitars – Fender Stratocaster (left) & Gibson Melody Maker SG (right)

• Lead guitar – Hamer USA Studio Custom

****

In my view, the clean, business-like look of the new Bluetone-pedals is a clear bonus, especially on stage. Sure, the Fried Eye and Bugaboo don’t sport any flashy paint jobs that scream ”Hey, man, I’m a weird boutique pedal”, but at least you can tell instantly what type of pedal you’re dealing with, and which knob (or switch) does what.

In terms of their sounds both units are winners, each offering a wide array of different shades of distortion, with the Fried Eye being a bit more ”Rock” and the Bugaboo a tad more ”Metal” in character. These are professional grade, handmade effect pedals at a fair price.Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

24/10/2018

Rockway-blogiin on ilmestynyt uusi ukuleletesti

Löydät testin TÄÄLTÄ.

Save

13/09/2018

Rockway-blogiin tulossa uusi ukuleletesti

Ortega RUDAWN-CE (129,90 €)

• 24”/38,4 cm mensuuri
• mahonkikaula
• otelauta pähkinäpuusta
• 18 nauhaa
• ABS-satula, 35 mm
• reunalistoitettu kaikukoppa okoumevanerista
• pähkinäpuinen talla
• ABS-tallaluu
• suljetut virittimet
• MagusUke-etuvahvistin: volume- ja tone-säätimet, kromaattinen viritysmittari

Reno RU-320E (119 €)

• 24”/38,4 cm mensuuri
• mahonkikaula
• reunalistoitettu blackwoodotelauta
• 18 nauhaa
• luusatula, 35 mm
• kokopuinen kuusikansi
• sivut ja pohja zebranopuuta
• pähkinäpuinen talla
• tallaluu aitoa naudanluuta
• kopan reunalistoitus ja rosetti: abalonepaloja ja ABS-listaa
• avoimet virittimet
• Belcat UK-500T -etuvahvistin: 3-alueinen EQ, kromaattinen viritysmittari

Tanglewood TWT-12E (136 €; gigbag kuuluu hintaan)

• 24”/38,4 cm mensuuri
• okoumekaula kaularaudalla
• puinen otelauta
• 18 nauhaa
• ABS-satula, 35 mm
• kaikukoppa ovangkolvanerista, kaareva pohja
• puinen talla
• ABS-tallaluu
• laserkaiverrettu rosette
• avoimet virittimet
• Tanglewood TEQ-TUT -etuvahvistin: volume- ja tone-säätimet, kromaattinen viritysmittari
• laadukas topattu pussi kuuluu hintaan

06/02/2018

Review: Tokai TJM-140

We at Kitarablogi HQ received a very special instrument for review this time – the new Tokai TJM-140, which is based on Fender’s Jazzmaster.

When the original Jazzmaster was released in 1958 Fender aimed it squarely at Jazz and Lounge musicians, who had found the company’s earlier offerings much too bright and Country-sounding. The Jazzmaster also was Fender’s first model with a rosewood fingerboard, something their sales force had been requesting for years (for cosmetic reasons).

Sadly, the new model wasn’t received very enthusiastically. Most Jazz guitarists still felt that Fender guitars were nothing more than mere breadboards with strings, while others complained that the new control setup was too complicated. A shame, really…

Over the last years Jazzmaster-type offset guitars have definitely become en vogue again. Thanks to this trend Tokai, too, has decided to come up with its own version of this guitar classic.

****

The Tokai TJM-140 Silver Star (reviewed version: 1.495 €; basic model: 1.445 €) is a top-quality Japanese rendition of the Jazzmaster model, which stays faithful to the original classic in most respects, with a few modern improvements. The review sample has been customised further with a set of Seymour Duncan Antiquity pickups.

Tokai’s TJM-140 strongly channels an early-Sixties spirit – this guitar comes with the original, small Fender-style headstock, as well as an unbound rosewood fretboard with small dot markers.

Beneath its classy Olympic White finish the curvaceous body is crafted from alder, while the satin-finished neck is maple.

Putting the truss rod adjustment at the headstock end is one of the welcome improvements on the TJM-140.

The Tokai sports a set of fine Kluson copies made by Gotoh.

This model comes with 22 medium-sized frets. The fretwork is very clean.

Leo Fender had a thing for vibratos, which he called tremolos. For the Jazzmaster he came up with a special new system. The Jazzmaster-vibrato (which was later used on the Jaguar, too) comprises a front-installed vibrato/tailpiece-combination, paired with a separate bridge. The bridge stands on height-adjustable poles inside long ferrules, and it rocks slightly back and forth during vibrato use. The Tokai Silver Star uses a well-made Japanese copy of the original system.

You don’t need to be a guitar expert to see that Leo Fender was aiming for a Gibson P-90-vibe with his flat and wide Jazzmaster pickups. Both the P-90 and Jazzmaster pickup have similar coils, but their magnetic structure puts them apart. Gibson’s P-90 uses two long bar magnets placed underneath the coil, either side of a metal spacer, to magnetise its pickup. Fender, on the other hand, uses six slug magnets, which also serve as the pickup’s pole pieces.

The pickups in Seymour Duncan’s Antiquity-set are reverse wound/reverse polarity, resulting in a hum-cancelling middle position on the toggle switch.

The special feature of Jazzmasters is the so-called rhythm circuit. The slide switch above the neck pickup switches between the lead and rhythm circuits. In rhythm, only the neck pickup is selected, with a slight treble roll-off and its own set of volume and tone control wheels.

The solo circuit uses the regular set of controls – a three-position toggle, plus master volume and tone. Each circuit works independently of the other’s settings.

****

In my view, every guitarist should try a Jazzmaster- or Jaguar-style guitar once in his/her life, just to experience that comfortable offset body. Some players feel that the offset waist of a Jazzmaster is even more ergonomic that a Strat.

The Tokai TJM-140 is a fine example of a Jazzmaster-style guitar. Our test sample is light in weight, the neck’s oval C-profile feels great in your hand, and the guitar arrived with an expert setup.

Still, the Jazzmaster-vibrato will continue to divide opinions for the foreseeable future. The push-fit vibrato arm isn’t as foolproof as the screw-in Stratocaster arm, and it tends to swing rather loosely, when not in use. With a contemporary string set of 009- or 010-gauge you will probably run into some problems sooner or later, due to the shallow string angle over the bridge. Forceful strumming and/or large bends tend to cause light string gauges to jump out of the bridge saddles’ grooves, spoiling your setup and tuning in the process.

You cannot blame the Tokai TJM-140 Silver Star for using a faithful copy of the original vibrato, because this guitar is meant to be a vintage-inspired instrument. Nevertheless, it’s important to know about any possible pitfalls and solutions.

The easiest way to get a Jazzmaster-vibrato to play nicely is to use the correct string gauges of the late 1950s – read: flatwound 011s or 012s with a wound g-string. If this seems unbearable there’s always the screw-on Whizzo Buzz Stop, a Bigsby-style roller that adds much-needed downward pressure at the tailpiece. Others like to take the far more drastic step of replacing the whole Jazzmaster-system with a Mastery-vibrato, a replacement made specifically for use with modern strings.

Tokai’s TJM-140 Silver Star nails the Jazzmaster tone like a champion. The Antiquity pickups give you lots of chime and sparkle, but the top end is much warmer than on a Strat, and there’s a nice dose of mid-range chunk. The rhythm circuit rolls off a little bit of the neck pickup’s treble, but still keeps things from going all dark and muddy.

Here are a few clips of the Tokai TJM-140, recorded with a Bluetone Shadows Jr. combo, a Boss SD-1 overdrive and a Shure SM57:

****

Tokai’s TJM-140 is a pro quality Japanese version of the Fender Jazzmaster. The Tokai plays and feels great, and its sound really leaves nothing to be desired. The original Jazzmaster-/Jaguar-vibrato might become a deal-breaker for some, but I feel the original system adds a lot to this guitar’s sound and mystique. Tokai uses a high-quality copy of the original vibrato, which works as smoothly as it should. Taking this instrument for a spin is highly recommended!

****

Tokai Guitars TJM-140

Price with Antiquity pickups: 1.495 €

Distribution: Tokai Guitars Nordic

Pros:

+ workmanship

+ playability

+ sound

+ idiosyncratic vibrato system

Cons:

– idiosyncratic vibrato systemSave

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

25/01/2018

Testipenkissä: Tokai TJM-140

Tällä kertaa Kitarablogi sai hieman erikoisemman herkkupalan testattavaksi – Fender Jazzmasteriin perustuva Tokai TJM-140.

Kun alkuperäinen Jazzmaster ilmestyi vuonna 1958, Fenderillä oli tähtäimessä Jazz- ja Lounge-musiikin soittajat, joiden mielestä firman aikaisemmat mallit soivat aivan liian terävästi ja kantrimaisesti. Jazzmaster oli myös ensimmäinen Fenkku, jolla oli ruusupuusta veistetty otelauta (jotain, jota firman myyntitiimi oli jo pidemmän aikaa toivonut ulkonäöllisistä syistä).

Valitettavasti uuden huippumallin vastaanotto oli suhteellisen vaisu. Monille Jazz-kitaristeille myös Fenderin uutuusmalli näytti kielillä varustetulta leipälaudalta, ja alkuinnostuksen jälkeen monet sen aikakauden soittajista pitivät kitaran elektroniikkaa turhan monimutkaisena, mikä oli sääli.

Viime vuosina Jazzmaster-tyyliset offset-runkoiset kitarat elävät uutta nousukautta, minkä ansiosta myös Tokai on päättänyt julkaista oman versionsa kitarasta.

****

Tokai TJM-140 Silver Star (testattu versio 1.495 €; perusversio 1.445 €) on hyvin laadukas japanilainen tulkinta Jazzmaster-teemasta, joka pysyy kaikissa pääasioissa uskollisena alkuperäiseen klassikkoon, muutamalla hyvin perustellulla nykyaikaisella parannuksella. Testiyksilöä on lisäksi kustomoitu testiä varten erittäin laadukkailla Seymour Duncan Antiquity -mikrofoneilla.

Tokai TJM-140:ssä elää vahvasti varhaisen 1960-luvun henki – tässä mallissa on alkuperäinen pieni viritinlapa, sekä ruusupuinen otelauta ilman reunalistoitusta ja pienillä pyöreillä otemerkeillä.

Olympic white -tyylisen viimeistelyn alta löytyy kurvikas leppärunko, kun taas mattaviimeistelty kaula on veistetty vaahterasta.

TJM-140:n kaularautaan pääsee kätevästi käsiksi lavan puolelta, mikä on erittäin tervetullut parannus.

Tokain laadukkaat Kluson-kopiot tulevat Gotohin valikoimasta.

Otelautaan on siististi asennettu 22 medium-kokoista nauhaa.

Leo Fender kehitti Jazzmasteria varten uuden vibratojärjestelmän. Jazzmaster-vibrassa (jota käytettiin myöhemmin myös Jaguarissa) on edestä runkoon upotettu veitsenterä-laakeroitu kieltenpidin, sekä erillinen talla, joka keinuu runkoon upotetuissa metalliholkissa hieman edestakaisin, silloin kun vibratoa käytetään. Tokai Silver Starissa käytetään järjestelmästä tarkkaa japanilaista jäljitelmää.

Jazzmaster-mikrofoneja voi hyvällä omatunnolla pitää Fenderin versiona Gibson P-90 -mikrofonista. Molemmissa mikkimalleissa on hyvin leveät, mutta suhteellisen matalat kelat. Mikrofonien magneettikenttien rakenteet kuitenkin poikkeavat toisistaan: Gibson käyttää P-90:ssä kahta pitkää ja matalaa harkkomaista magneettia kelan alla, kun taas Jazzmaster-mikissä on kuusi lyhyttä, kelan läpi menevää tankomagneettia.

Seymour Duncan Antiquity -setissä tallamikrofoni on kaulamikrofoniin nähden käämitty vastasuuntaan ja sen magneetit ovat ylösalaisin (reverse wound/reverse polarity), minkä ansiosta mikeistä muodostuu yhteiskäytössä humbucker.

Elektroniikan erikoisuus on Jazzmaster-kitaroihin lisätty erillinen ns. “komppi-piiri”. Kaulamikrofonin yllä olevalla liukukytkimellä voi kytkeä TJM-140-mallin ns. soolotilasta komppitilaan, jossa ainoastaan kaulamikki on päällä, ja sen signaali menee tällöin kytkimen viereen pleksiin upotettuihin volume- ja tone-säätimien läpi.

Soolotilassa taas kitaran soundia säädetään sen sijaan soittimen perinteisellä kolmiasentoisella kytkimellä, sekä master-volumella ja -tonella.

****

Minun mielestäni jokaisen kitaristin pitäisi ainakin kerran elämässään kokeilla Jazzmaster- tai Jaguar-tyylistä kitaraa, niiden mukavan offset-rungon takia. Joidenkin mielestä näiden mallien epäsymmetrinen vyötärö ja pyöristetty olemus tuntuu jopa Stratoa mukavammalta.

Tokain TJM-140 on malliesimerkki mukavasta Jazzmaster-tyylisestä kitarasta. Testikitara on suhteellisen kevyt, kaulan ovaali C-profiili istuu todella hyvin käteen, ja kitara saapui testiin esimerkillisillä säädöillä.

Jazzmaster-vibrato tulee kuitenkin jatkossakin jakamaan käyttäjien mielipiteitä. Paikkaan työnnettävä vibrakampi ei ole aina niin toimintavarma kuin ruuvattava Strato-kamppi, ja se repsottaa myös melko löysästi mekanismissa. Jos taas on tottunut käyttämään nykyaikaisia 009- tai 010-kielisatseja vibrajärjestelmän loivasta kielikulmasta tallassa voi koitua ongelmia. Raskas plektrakäsi ja/tai isot bendaukset voivat johtua suhteellisen ohuilla kielillä siihen, että yksi kuin toinenkin kieli voi hyppiä välillä pois tallapalan urasta, mikä vaikuttaa sitten suoraan kitaran vireeseen ja soittotuntumaan.

Tokai TJM-140 Silver Staria ei oikein voi kritisoida vibraton toiminnasta, sillä kitaran tarkoitushan on olla tarkka kopio alkuperäisestä klassikosta. On kuitenkin tärkeää, että tietää näistä mahdollisista ongelmakohdista ja niiden ratkaisemisesta.

Helpoin tapa ratkaista Jazzmaster-vibran ongelmat on käyttää 1950-luvun kielikokoja – siis: 011- tai 012-satseja punotuilla g-kielillä. Jos tällainen tuntuu liian karulta voi vibramekanismin eteen helposti lisätä (ruuvaamalla) Whizzo Buzz Stop -nimisen Bigsbyn-kaltaisen rullan, joka lisää kielten alasvetoa, mikä pitää kitaran kielet paremmin talapalojen urissa. Jos lisärulla ei miellytä jostain syystä, voi myös korvata alkuperäisen järjestelmän Mastery-vibratolla ja -tallalla, jotka on suunniteltu nykyaikaisia kielisatseja varten.

Myös soundiltaan Tokai TJM-140 on erinomainen lajinsa edustaja. Antiquity-mikeillä kitara soi heleästi, mutta paljon lämpimämmin kuin esim. Strato-tyylinen kitara. Komppi-piiri leikkaa tahallaan kaulamikrofonin signaalista hieman diskanttia, mutta ilman että soundi muuttuisi mutaiseksi.

Tältä kuulostaa Tokai TJM-140 Bluetone Shadows Jr. -kombon ja Boss SD-1 -särön kautta soitettuna:

****

Tokain TJM-140 on hyvin laadukas japanilainen versio Fender Jazzmasterista. Tokain soittotuntuma on erinomainen ja sen soundi ei todellakaan jätä toivomisen varaa. Alkuperäinen Jazzmaster-/Jaguar-vibra tulee varmaan jatkossakin jakamaan kitaristien mielipiteitä, vaikka Tokai-kitarassa on käytössä laadukas versio alkuperäisestä. Vibraton pehmeässä soundissa ei kuitenkaan ole mitään vikaa. Suosittelen koeajelua!

****

Tokai Guitars TJM-140

Hinta Antiquity-mikeillä 1.495 €

Maahantuoja: Musamaailma

Plussat:

+ työnjälki

+ soitettavuus

+ soundi

+ omintakeinen vibrato

Miinukset:

– omintakeinen vibratoSave

Save

Save

23/01/2018

Tokai TJM-140 – The Kitarablogi video

Lisätiedot: Musamaailma

19/01/2018

Guitar Porn: Tokai TJM-140

Lisätiedot: Musamaailma

10/01/2018

Tokai TJM-140 +++ Testi tulossa +++ Working on a review

Tokai TJM-140

Japanese copy of a Fender Jazzmaster. The test guitar came upgraded with a set of Duncan Antiquities.

****

All guitar tracks recorded with a Bluetone Shadows Jr. combo, a Boss SD-1 Overdrive pedal, and a Shure SM57 microphone.

Lisätiedot: Musamaailma

07/11/2017

Now on SoundCloud: Mustang GT40

Fender Mustang GT40

• Digital practice and recording amp
• 40 W power (2x 20 W)
• Speakers: 2x 6.5″
• 21 Amp models
• 47 Effects
• Controls for Gain, Volume, Treble, Bass & Master
• Three layer buttons
• Tap button
• USB recording output
• Aux input
• Headphone output
• Digital chromatic tuner
• Bluetooth audio streaming
• Easy WIFI firmware and feature updates
• Editing and sharing via Fender Tone app (iOS & Android)

****

Demo tracks recorded with a pair of Shure SM57s.
Guitars used – Fender (Japan) ’62 Telecaster Custom reissue & Hamer USA Studio Custom

11/09/2017

Mustang GT40 – the Kitarablogi-video

Fender Mustang GT40

• Digital practice and recording amp
• 40 W power (2x 20 W)
• Speakers: 2x 6.5″
• 21 Amp models
• 47 Effects
• Controls for Gain, Volume, Treble, Bass & Master
• Three layer buttons
• Tap button
• USB recording output
• Aux input
• Headphone output
• Digital chromatic tuner
• Bluetooth audio streaming
• Easy WIFI firmware and feature updates
• Editing and sharing via Fender Tone app (iOS & Android)

****

Demo track recorded with a Shure SM57.
Guitar used – Fender (Japan) ’62 Telecaster Custom reissue